Dateline: Barn in the Boonies

Jan
15

Crooked Little Hen is my oldest chicken.
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She has a crossed beak. A crossed beak is where the upper and lower halves go opposite directions and it is a genetic defect. She was born that way. (If you missed them, I have some really cute posts about her, including The Crooked Little Hen Saves the Day and A Crooked Little Hen Love Story.) Used to, every time I posted a picture of her someone would tell me she was gonna die! Die, I tell you! She’d never make it! She’s six.
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Crooked: “The rumors of my death are greatly exaggerated.”


Coco:
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It’s been two years now since there was A Crushing Event followed by A Miracle. (To get the whole story, click through to those posts. In short, Coco was hit by a car, ran away injured, and returned home a week later.) The injury to Coco’s leg was severe, but she has recovered wonderfully. She has a limp, will always have a limp, but it doesn’t stop her from running around! She’s still the sweetest Giant Puppy on earth and somehow tolerates that crazy Chloe.

I still have a mean goose.
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Mostly because it would take a really big pressure cooker to cook him up tender. Or at least that’s what I tell him! Which keeps him running from me.

Nutmeggy:
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It’s winter, snowing and raining most days lately, and the goats are in their usual “We don’t like this weather!” mode. They have moved into the barn and set up housekeeping.

Maia comes running for me as soon as she sees me.
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Which is why most photos of Maia look like this:
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Occasionally she gives my camera a break when she stops to admire me. (Ha.)
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She is my precious.
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She follows me everywhere she can. Here, she’s sticking her head through a hole as I’m going up to the loft to get hay. She likes to keep her eye on me. She still comes up to the yard and the porch on days it’s not snowing or raining. And always will! And if that’s wrong, I don’t want to be right!

Still plenty of hay in the loft, by the way:
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Meanwhile, due to an issue with the latch on the back alleyway door, the sheep moved in with the cows. They didn’t ask permission, and I don’t think anyone is happy about it (including the cows). I keep putting them back in the front barn yard and they keep putting themselves back in the back barn yard. Nobody ever said sheep were smart.
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And then they complain that they never get to eat any hay until Glory Bee and Dumplin are finished. I’m expecting to have the alleyway door latch fixed within a few days and then peace will be restored to the land.

My Glory Bee Bee:
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We’re expecting a baby in a few months!
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She spends a lot of time contemplating how she will handle two children when she has so much trouble with one.
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And a fine-looking 13-month-old heifer, she is, that Dumplin! She is owned by my neighbor now, but still living at Sassafras Farm for the time being. I will be separating her from her mama soon, and oh what a bellowing that will be! (My neighbor is planning to keep her to breed, so her story will not have an ending involving ketchup.)

The equine contingency was unavailable for comment this morning, but Zip, Shortcake, and Poky are doing just fine. In other words, I went out to do chores earlier than usual this morning so I could get pictures and the horses weren’t down to their shelter and feeder yet. They know my usual routine. (Will get some pics of them later.) I haven’t made a decision about Poky yet. Morgan is lobbying for keeping her and getting her bred, but I haven’t decided. Nor do I have a jack to replace Jack. I’ll let you know.

And that’s the latest around the barn! It is winter, and all is well and munching on hay.

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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on January 15, 2014  

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Comments

10 Responses | RSS feed for comments on this post

  1. 1-15
    12:27
    pm

    :happyflower:
    My goodness, how time flies, it seems like just yesterday the day Crooked Little Hen arrived and Coco’s accident. Time goes by so quickly,— how the number of your animals has grown. I could never be a farmer, most of my animals would be pets. I was raised on a farm until I was 4 years old and I was sure that all of the animals there were for me and they were mine to be played with. I am truly an amimal lover :snuggle:

  2. 1-15
    3:23
    pm

    Oh I loved this post. We haven’t seen too much of the chickens and goats lately, and I’ve missed them :cry: I too would be helpless on a farm. All the animals would be my babies too!

  3. 1-15
    4:01
    pm

    I think they are pets…with human perception! Purrfect! Everyone lives a good life. I can hardly wait for each new post, lesson and/or birth. I’ve been here for years too :heart:

  4. 1-15
    6:51
    pm

    I just loved your animal stories…I am new to your blog and to read about Coco and your chicken how cute!?

  5. 1-15
    8:21
    pm

    Thank you so much for the update. Love Crooked Little Hen, I have her picture from the Kickstarter event. How is Gwennie? Maybe I have just missed any recent mention or pics of her. Is that Annebelle in the sheep picture, she is certainly mid aged now.

  6. 1-15
    11:06
    pm

    What a delightful post on a cold winter’s day. :sun:
    From Eastern NC

  7. 1-16
    12:19
    am

    What a great catch-up post. Its been a while! Love seeing all the animals and glad to know they’re all doing well this winter. So glad Ross is home…have fun!

  8. 1-16
    12:13
    pm

    It’s great to have an update. Thank you.

    You cracked me up with “an ending involving ketchup.” Too funny!

  9. 1-17
    6:18
    pm

    I believe the cow’s halter needs to be adjusted. It should not be so tight across her nose. It isn’t a bridle.

  10. 1-18
    10:53
    am

    Always enjoy reading your stories! I have a crooked little hen too, she had a broken toe and now her middle toe curls to one side and sometime she walk a little funny but she love life and here she will live forever, just love her!

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The Slanted Little House

"It was a cold wintry day when I brought my children to live in rural West Virginia. The farmhouse was one hundred years old, there was already snow on the ground, and the heat was sparse-—as was the insulation. The floors weren’t even, either. My then-twelve-year-old son walked in the door and said, “You’ve brought us to this slanted little house to die." Keep reading our story....






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