;

Weekend with Animals

Feb
25

It was a busy animal day here on Saturday, one of those days where I handle every animal on the farm. The farrier was coming, and Morgan wasn’t home. Moving the horses and donkeys from the field back to the barn by myself is a task. If I do it right, Shortcake will follow Zip. Usually. Donkeys follow no one and generally require some pushing and shoving and cajoling to go where you want them to go. First, I had to move the sheep and goats and dogs out of their field so I could move the equine people through to the barn within fencing. It must have been my lucky day because this went off without a hitch. Morgan came home not long after I finished doing it by myself. Of course! And she had to go look for herself because she was so shocked that I had done it without her. Ha.

Zip, getting the treatment:
IMG_7159
The farrier, showing Morgan how he holds front feet, which is different than how she was taught before:
IMG_7161
My beloved:
IMG_7162
Morgan’s boyfriend was with her and she thought he ought to learn something about farming. Or she thought it would be funny. Poky is the “difficult” donkey to hold during trimming, so he got that job.
IMG_7167
I had Dumplin shut up in the milking parlor because I was planning to milk Glory Bee in the evening. She’s a growing girl and her halter needed loosening. Since I had both Morgan and her boyfriend on hand, I suggested we all tackle the calf together and work on her halter. Three on one.

Morgan, WHO HAD LITTLE TO DO WITH GLORY BEE WHEN SHE WAS A BABY, glanced at the angelic demon-in-disguise I already had handily confined and said, “That’s no big deal. I can do it.” She was scoffing at me a bit. Scoffing!

I said, “Okay, smartypants.” I didn’t figure Dumplin would kill her since the boyfriend was there if (WHEN) this didn’t go so well, so I went back to the house.
IMG_7181
Morgan came back to the house a little while later. “I HATE COWS! I’M NEVER TOUCHING A COW AGAIN!”

She says this after every time she touches a cow. I don’t think she gets cows, but I’m here to tell ya, she gets calves now. Dumplin ran her around the milking parlor until she had to get her boyfriend to tackle the new bad baby while Morgan finally got her halter loosened up. Everybody was a little the worse for wear by the time that was accomplished.

Except me. I was sitting on the couch laughing.

Comments Leave a Comment
Share: |    Subscribe to my feed Subscribe
Posted by Suzanne McMinn on February 25, 2013  

More posts you might enjoy:


Sign up for the Chickens in the Road Newsletter



Comments

8 Responses
RSS feed for comments on this post | TrackBack this post

  1. 2-25
    7:32
    am

    Thatn is one fat and sassy lookin’ baby cow LOL! I recall the same sort of adventure the first time my DH decided clipping pug toenails was easy and I was just a sissy. Your daughter’s adventure went easier ;)

  2. 2-25
    8:38
    am

    Gotta say, as much trouble as the original Bad Baby was, the new bad baby is half a beefy bad baby. Beef cows and dairy cows really are practically two different species temperment wise. Not that they can’t still be sweet, just a bit… heavy duty and they know it.

  3. 2-25
    9:01
    am

    I read the last line and cracked completely up!
    Sometimes ya gotta laugh at the whipper-snappers and their “mom is such a ditz, she doesn’t know ANYTHING!” attitude. And then laugh some more (somewhere where they can’t see you laughing) when life hands them a dose of reality.

    It gets even better when they have kids of their own. Oh. Yeah! Though, sometimes it’s hard to be quiet and just let them learn. But eventually – sooner, rather than later, they will come to you for advice. And wait until you hear YOUR words coming out of THEIR mouths at their kids. And THEY realize that they just parroted you. Yep! Just try not to snicker too loudly, they’re feeling sheepish enough. Plus, you get to snuggle and kiss on the babies and toddlers and then SEND THEM HOME for their parents to walk the floors with and deal with the tantrums.

    As the old song says; “Oh, baby, let the good times roll!”

  4. 2-25
    9:44
    am

    Hahaha!!! Hilarious!!! That is one pretty calf, and mischief just popping out all over her! Funny stuff! Love all the comments too – hope everyone has a great week! :heart:

  5. 2-25
    10:36
    am

    She sure is a pretty calf, betcha she will be a beautiful cow.

  6. 2-26
    10:29
    am

    Suzanne, there is a cure for moving the donkeys, they will go anywhere for carrots and bread. Mine follows anyone with goodies and every cow will follow you for a piece of bread. They have to have it often for a while to get them used to it then they will come running to you when you call them just because they think you have it. That is how we move the herd and donkey every time we need to work with them. It is so much easier even moving the bull. Remember when you gave the goats cookies and they came running to get them every time they saw you. EVERY other animal on your farm will also. Stand back open the gate and let them have a small piece of bread. One slice a day won’t hurt them until you get them used to it then cut back and just give it often. You’ll NEVER chase another cow, goat, horse, or donkey. Short Cake will eat short cake out of your hand….
    Or keep us laughing until our ribs hurt. I love your posts though, I have to admit.

  7. 2-27
    5:01
    pm

    That is a pretty, pretty girl!

  8. 2-28
    8:29
    am

    That was just to darn funny!!!!! Poor Morgan, guess she will think twice about thinking its so easy to get a hold of a calf. :cowsleep:

Leave a Reply

Registration is required to leave a comment on this site. You may register here. (You can use this same username on the forum as well.) Already registered? Login here.

Discussion is encouraged, and differing opinions are welcome. However, please don't say anything your grandmother would be ashamed to read. If you see an objectionable comment, you may flag it for moderation. If you write an objectionable comment, be aware that it may be flagged--and deleted. I'm glad you're here. Welcome to our community!

Daily Farm

IMG_2644











If you would like to help support the overhead costs of this website, you may donate. Thank you!

Sign up for the
Chickens in the Road Newsletter




The Slanted Little House

"It was a cold wintry day when I brought my children to live in rural West Virginia. The farmhouse was one hundred years old, there was already snow on the ground, and the heat was sparse-—as was the insulation. The floors weren’t even, either. My then-twelve-year-old son walked in the door and said, “You’ve brought us to this slanted little house to die." Keep reading our story....



Today on Chickens in the Road


Join the Community in the Forum

Search This Blog



Out My Window

74°F Mostly Cloudy

Walton, WV

Calendar

July 2014
S M T W T F S
« Jun    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  


I Love Your Comments

I Have a Cow


And she's ornery. Read my barnyard stories!



Entire Contents © Copyright 2004-2013 Chickens in the Road, Inc.
Text and photographs may not be published, broadcast, redistributed or aggregated without express permission. Thank you.

Privacy Policy, Disclosure, Disclaimer, and Terms of Use

Contact