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Frittering

Oct
31


When I was a kid, I had a thing for corn fritters. I was excited any time my mother was going to make corn fritters with dinner, and due to my unnatural fritter enthusiasm, making the corn fritters eventually became my job. So let that teach you a lesson!

I’m just kidding. Corn fritters are easy to make! So fritter away! Here’s how I make mine. You can use fresh, canned, or frozen. Sometimes I like to add about a half tablespoon of herbs, such as parsley or rosemary.

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How to make Corn Fritters:

1 cup corn, drained
1 cup milk
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornmeal
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 egg
oil for frying

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and stir just until combined.

Heat oil in a skillet (about 375, medium high) and pour batter out in rounds. The mixture should be about pancake consistency. If it’s too thick, add a little more milk; if it’s too thin, add a little flour. Fry about two minutes per side till golden; drain and keep warm till serving. (Be sure to cook them all the way through, so don’t get in too much of a hurry.)

When I was a kid, I made these on an electric griddle, just like pancakes, with no oil. I don’t have an electric griddle now, so I use a skillet with oil, which, of course, makes them that much better. I loved corn fritters before I even knew how good they really were. My mother would never do such a thing as fry in oil, so if you have an electric griddle, go ahead.

I often eat them plain, but back in the day I used to like them with ketchup. You can make all kinds of veggie fritters, by the way. Think outside the corn box! Chop and drain peppers, onions, mushrooms, whatever you have on hand. You can also do fruit fritters–apple, peach, pear, etc. Use one cup chopped, drained fruit to replace the one cup corn and add a couple tablespoons of sugar to the mixture. After frying, dust with powdered sugar or serve with syrup for a breakfast or dessert treat. You can pour syrup over the classic corn fritters, too, by the way, and that is ridiculously awesome. I like to eat them as a snack or as a meal by itself. You can truly make a fritter out of anything, including adding cooked chopped or ground meat. Or M&Ms. I’m just kidding. Maybe.

But whatever you do, don’t get too enthusiastic about them. Try to get one of your kids excited and make it their job then you can truly fritter.

This recipe makes about 9-12 fritters, depending on size.

See this recipe at Farm Bell Recipes and save it to your recipe box.


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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on October 31, 2011  

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Comments

11 Responses
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  1. 10-31
    7:02
    am

    :woof: yummo! they looks great. can’t wait to try!

  2. 10-31
    7:56
    am

    These look delicious! I’m going to find some of the corn we put in the freezer and try some!

  3. 10-31
    9:47
    am

    Those look wonderful! I can’t wait to try them, and I know my husband will love them. My mom refuses to fry, too. I blame her for my inability to fry an egg decently!

  4. 10-31
    9:56
    am

    Fritters when I was a kid were for special occasions only. (Maybe because we had no electric griddle, and because Mom was on a no fat diet?) But they sure were yummy!

    The ones she usually made were pineapple fritters. Drained, canned crushed pineapple, and using some of the juice in the batter.

    Ahhhh. Great memory this morning. Thanks! :wave:

  5. 10-31
    12:09
    pm

    Thanks for this. I’ve been thinking about corn fritters lately. My big sister used to make them, and they were a favorite of mine. She deep-fried hers, and the batter was somewhat thicker than yours; it held together in little balls, sort of like hush puppies. I don’t think hers had cornmeal in them, although it’s hard to remember exactly something I ate 40 years ago and never cooked myself. They were savory and the corn flavor came from the kernels of corn. I have a vague idea that she used creamed corn. My sister gave me a lot of her recipes when I got married, but not that one. She probably thought it was too advanced for my rudimentary cooking skills!

    I think I’ll give your recipe a try, because I like the idea of cooking them like griddle cakes instead of frying them.

  6. 10-31
    1:41
    pm

    These are soooo yummy. Squash blossoms would be an idea. Squash blossoms are wonderful fried! Wonder what it would taste like to replace the corn with poke salad or turnip greens. Maybe I’ll try that!

  7. 11-1
    3:38
    pm

    Fritter memories for me meant the “round supper”. My mom would take the leftover mashed potatoes from the night before (Why, when we were kids, were there always leftover mashed potatoes? My family tends to eat them right up.) Anyway, leftover mashed potatoes made into “patties”, corn fritters (one can of creamed corn, one of regular, egg, flour, salt, pepper, baking powder, no cornmeal but I like the addition) also called patties and salmon, also pattied, egg, onion, bread or cracker crumbs, a little milk. Fried in a round cast iron skillet. “Round supper”, see? And peas. Not because they’re round, because they go with salmon.

  8. 11-2
    2:43
    am

    I have another receipe for Fritters as follows:

    3 cups all purpose flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    9 tablespoons sugar
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    3 cups milk
    Mix all dry ingredients thoroughly
    Add milk and mix well
    Then fry as stated above

    These are great for breakfast or as a snack.

  9. 11-2
    6:01
    pm

    Another “no fry zone” here too. Zucchini, onions, and shredded potatoes. Very close to latkes. Love veggies used up like this. When done with the electric skillet, very good for you.

  10. 11-2
    6:34
    pm

    About a year ago I went on a hunt for a corn fritter recipe as we had an over abundance of home-canned corn in the pantry that I needed to use up and I wanted some variety. The recipe I found to be a favorite is almost identical tot he one you posted.

    When I was a kid my Mum made fritters from corn, apples, pears and clams… not all together, She made lots of different fritters, those were just the ones I can recall.

    Thanks for your post, they look yummy!
    RUth in NH

  11. 11-3
    9:27
    pm

    Appalachian tempura !!!

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