;

Bring Your Chore Boots

Oct
5


Recently, I started contributing to Chevy Culture, a lifestyle and auto site sponsored by Chevrolet. My first piece is up now! I’m excited to have the opportunity, and I hope you’ll check out my articles there.


“Whether you’d rather travel to a working farm, a living historical farm, a rural bed and breakfast or a state park, chances are there’s a “haycation” near you where you can pick produce, card wool or witness the birth of a new calf—and that’s just the beginning. Many venues offer more in-depth educational programs and “full farmhand” days where you get to be the farmer.”

Click here for the full post on Chevy Culture, and look for more in the next few weeks and months.

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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on October 5, 2012  

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Comments

9 Responses | RSS feed for comments on this post

  1. 10-5
    9:37
    am

    Excellent!

  2. 10-5
    10:34
    am

    But…but…you drive an “Exploder” (as do I)?!?

  3. 10-5
    10:35
    am

    congrats!! how’s the memoir coming along? any new details on release?

  4. 10-5
    10:38
    am

    I don’t have a firm release date yet. Next fall, I believe.

  5. 10-5
    7:45
    pm

    Wonderful!

  6. 10-5
    8:23
    pm

    A little off topic, but who won the beautiful teapot etc. in the Farm Bell Sept. drawing? Haven’t seen the winner posted…

  7. 10-5
    10:41
    pm

    I enjoyed your article. It reminded me of touring a cranberry farm at Double Trouble State Park in New Jersey, where they still do harvesting by hand, the old-fashioned way.

    In Australia, they have a program called “Farm Home Stay,” where working farms open their homes to visitors. It gives city folk a taste of farm life, and farmers a way to suppliment their income. We stayed in an old farmhouse at a sheep station there and had a wonderful visit. Farm vacations are the best.

  8. 10-5
    11:01
    pm

    Very nice article as always Suzanne! You’re one talented lady.

  9. 10-6
    8:14
    am

    I am getting to that today, brookdale! Pears got me behind here. (Edit to add: The post is up on FBR now!)

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The Slanted Little House

"It was a cold wintry day when I brought my children to live in rural West Virginia. The farmhouse was one hundred years old, there was already snow on the ground, and the heat was sparse-—as was the insulation. The floors weren’t even, either. My then-twelve-year-old son walked in the door and said, “You’ve brought us to this slanted little house to die." Keep reading our story....



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