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Hyperdrive

Dec
11


I’m preparing for winter, in a way I never expected. I’m preparing alone, in an all-new location, and with little time to make changes, repairs, additions I would like to make to suit my specific animals and their needs.

Every available day that I can put together the complex puzzle of people, equipment, and cooperative weather, I’m preparing. Yesterday, it was all about getting those round bales from Stringtown to the new farm. It turned into an all-day adventure (and a post unto itself as soon as I get a chance). At the end of the day, I got a call from the superboys that they were available to do some fencing today.

The fencing is important because, for some unknown reason, in all the connected fields on this farm, there is a gap in the fencing between the barn and the goat yard and all the connecting fields beyond. When snowstorms come, I want to be able to bring the sheep and goats to the barn without having to take them outside fencing to do it. This is especially important when it comes to the sheep, who like nothing better than to run off in the wrong direction and preferably down the road. I need the superboys to close the fencing gap.

I didn’t think they were going to be available until next weekend, so my day starts early with racing to one place to borrow the tools, the next place to pick up fence posts, and the next place to buy further supplies. And then somehow direct the superboys into building the fence I need them to build when I know nothing, I mean nothing, about fencing, and will be relying on the copious notes I took when goat farmer friend Pete was over here last week and told me what to tell them to do. He was pretty much speaking Greek to me, so I hope when I read the Greek to the superboys, they will understand!

Just another confusing, challenging, awesome day at Sassafras Farm!

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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on December 11, 2011  

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  1. 12-11
    1:25
    am

    They may not understand Greek, but I bet they understand fencing real well!

  2. 12-11
    3:44
    am

    :happyflower: I’m so happy for you! This is very exciting, and I am glad to be able to read your adventures IN YOUR NEW HOME!

  3. 12-11
    6:08
    am

    I think anyone who has a farm has many of these adventures. Nothing easy about owning and running a farm. You are simply an amazing woman Suzanne. :happyflower:

  4. 12-11
    6:10
    am

    I think once you get in there and have to do things out of your comfort zone like learning the basics of fencing, you’ll look back and wonder why you didn’t do it sooner. The feeling of getting these things done on your own will be priceless as I’m sure you know already. Sure wish I could borrow the superboys though!!

  5. 12-11
    7:12
    am

    Even though you have your hands full right now, it sounds like you are having the best of times.
    It will all work out in the end i am sure of it.
    Just keep on going….. and try to keep posting, it is so wonderfull to read your adventures :)

  6. 12-11
    7:45
    am

    Wondering why there are gaps in the fencing. Sounds like there should be a couple of gates put in. However, I think it would be easier and cheaper to put in fence than gates! You’re doing like most small farmers …do what you can and learn the rest from those that know! Life would be very dull without challenges!

  7. 12-11
    8:04
    am

    the two gents will know how to put fence up! the people in roane county just know how to do things like that…

  8. 12-11
    9:15
    am

    The superboys are hungry! They thought a nice Sunday dinner sounded good :) or some more pizza

  9. 12-11
    9:45
    am

    It will be done well and right, at the end of the day! Where are BP and Glory Bee? :moo:

  10. 12-11
    9:55
    am

    Suzanne, I have to tell you I got the ultimate test of fencing from DH this last summer. We had to build a new fence according to his standards and he is “FUSSY” not to mention “FUSSY” :hissyfit: . We had to pull the fence with a fence puller down a steep hill with the tractor and stand on the fence and nail it to wood posts set in concrete then put the connectors on the steel posts. It took us weeks. “”Be so very glad you didn’t get instruction from him.”” Your fence will be fine I’m sure and last for years. And, it has to be tight. Now you didn’t need to hear that did you?

    I can’t wait to see the finished product :heart: . Does anyone who puts up round bales wrap them so they will keep better?

  11. 12-11
    10:21
    am

    Yes, but isn’t it FUN! I admire your can-do attitude…you are a wonderful farmer, something I aspire to be.

  12. 12-11
    10:31
    am

    I can’t imagine not having a way to the barn for the animals!! My DH moves the fence around every whip stitch. Drives me crazy!! Our mules and horses do not get along in the same field.
    Suzanne, estate sales are great places to acquire farming tools that are needed.
    Have a great day!!

  13. 12-11
    11:35
    am

    Boy, talk about on-the-job training! What an adventure. Never a dull moment on the farm. I hope that when the snows arrive you’ll at least be able to catch your breath.

  14. 12-11
    12:02
    pm

    You are very brave!

  15. 12-11
    12:51
    pm

    The superboys are probably half way to getting that fence done by now. Hope all is going well. Putting in a fence can be challenging, and I’m sure we will hear all about it. :)
    Thanks for sharing your days with us, Suzanne. I look forward to hearing all about your adventures.
    Here is a link that you may find helpful. Lots of good stuff here, and there is also info on fences. They are in Washington state, but farmin’ is farmin’, right? Go to their Site Map.

    http://www.greenerpasturesfarm.com/

  16. 12-11
    12:52
    pm

    What I read was, “Blah, blah, blah, I HAVE A BARN, blah, blah.” :snoopy:

  17. 12-11
    2:06
    pm

    But you’re doing it yourself and that has to be a good feeling!

  18. 12-11
    4:04
    pm

    You know you wouldn’t have it any other way, Suzanne!

  19. 12-12
    2:33
    pm

    I know you are starting a list of tools you need to have on hand…

    especially for fencing and repairs. I remember just starting out and having to buy everything we needed. I bet those boys could tell you what you need for fencing…

    Every new job you do is something you will know how to do next time. Some fencing doesn’t even require extra help, just the right tools.

    The gaps are a curious thing? I would want them close asap too.

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