;

Licking the Bowl

Feb
22


Or, licking the branches….. Glory Bee must do boredom eating. Whenever she has nothing else to do, she nibbles on the extremely naked former Christmas tree that’s still in the goat yard. The goats, donkeys, and Glory Bee stripped that tree like nobody’s business!


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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on February 22, 2011  

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Comments

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  1. 2-22
    3:43
    pm

    Looks like it will be good kindling for next fall…if they leave any for you. GB is such a cutie.
    Pam

  2. 2-22
    3:57
    pm

    Are you really positive that heifer is not a bull??? She is huge!

  3. 2-22
    4:22
    pm

    :woof:
    I think we can all feel for Miss Glory Bee and boredom eating, hope she doesnt discover chocolate! We gals all know about our need for chocolate, especially when we are bored. I was bored yesterday—yum!

  4. 2-22
    4:39
    pm

    she is getting so BIG! still adorable!

  5. 2-22
    4:48
    pm

    Bored eating is never good, get that girl some therapy. ;)

  6. 2-22
    5:17
    pm

    I just participated in some bored eating myself, so I can relate. 2 pieces of chocolate. No day is complete without it.
    Suzanne

  7. 2-22
    5:32
    pm

    She’s adorable!

  8. 2-22
    5:36
    pm

    Minerals, she is after minerals that are in evergreens.

  9. 2-22
    5:38
    pm

    I can relate to boredom eating – she just needs a tv set…

  10. 2-22
    5:58
    pm

    She is so cute. She needs you to keep her company so she isn’t so bored. LOL

  11. 2-22
    5:58
    pm

    My cows love the stuff too, if a branch falls they are on it like bees on honey.

  12. 2-23
    6:39
    am

    She sure is in good condition…her halter seems a little snug again. I know I mention this now and then, but I was neglectful with Willow and she developed a sore on her nose. I was just ashamed of myself.

    I was wondering if you keep free choice salt/minerals out for everybody? Can goats and cows share the same minerals? I know nothing about goats or sheep.

  13. 2-23
    6:53
    am

    Yes, everybody has salt/mineral blocks. Sheep can’t have copper, so they need a different mineral block. Goats and everybody else can use sheep blocks, but sheep can’t use everybody else’s block. That’s one of the reasons we have them pastured separately most of the time.

  14. 2-23
    7:25
    am

    Suzanne,
    I have sheep and dairy cows also – I just get the sheep minerals for everyone as the dairy ration the cows get contains copper and I had read that cows don’t need too much copper anyway and also they get some in the summer pasture…makes things a little easier but I still have to separate cows and sheep as the dairy calf chases the sheep…..

  15. 2-23
    7:37
    am

    Speaking of branches falling and cows eating them… (Thanks Holstein Woman)Make sure there aren’t any wild cherry trees in reach of the animals. The leaves contain cyanide and are toxic to livestock. Wilted leaves are even worse since the poison is concentrated.
    This is your lurking public service announcer signing off now. Have a great day! 8)

  16. 2-23
    9:19
    am

    She sure looks like a Brown Swiss except for that Jersey face. If she is a boredom eater be sure you keep as much stray pieces of metal picked up as you can. Some cows will eat just about any thing and eating metal can lead to hardware disease. Especially any pieces of wire, fence staples and nails, these are the most dangerous as they can puncture internal organs. Maybe you need a feeder calf to keep her company. :devil2:

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