;

Loving It

Feb
13

IMG_7376
Fixing breakfast this morning–sausage gravy and biscuits with fried eggs on the side. Just look at those eggs! From one or two random eggs a day, in the past month with some feed changes, a timer light, and warm water delivered several times during the day, they’re up to 14 eggs a day now! (Yes, they have a heated waterer, but boy do they go through the water! We refill it through the day.)


Even the older hens are starting to lay again. The colored eggs are from my older girls–they’re Araucanas. The small white eggs are coming from the game hens. The big brown eggs are coming from the young girls–the Golden-Laced Wyandottes. They’re turning into excellent layers.

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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on February 13, 2016  

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  1. 2-13
    9:41
    am

    I take warm water to my chickens when it starts getting cold..I also fix them steelcut oatmeal sometimes..I have 12 hens and get average 7 eggs a day now.

  2. 2-13
    12:52
    pm

    Glad your girls are on the job. Our neighbor who is an old time chicken guy says warm water keeps his big flock laying all winter. He has the winter waterers, but takes them warm water too. Gloria

  3. 2-13
    1:32
    pm

    What kind of feed change did you make? Just wondering…I have 8 Delaware hens and a mean old rooster.

  4. 2-13
    1:51
    pm

    We started mixing cracked corn in with their layer pellets. The corn metabolizes hotter in their bodies. Or that’s the hope!

  5. 2-13
    5:43
    pm

    There is nothing like eating a freshly laid egg…those are beauties!

  6. 2-13
    5:53
    pm

    :happyflower:
    What beautiful eggs, they would look lovely in a country Easter basket. I love the different shades and colors. I am happy that you are getting plenty of eggs once again, breakfast sound yummy. :hungry:

  7. 2-14
    8:49
    am

    I’m sure the hens are drinking, but as well the air is dryer in winter. You’re losing a lot through evaporation. No harm refilling, though.

  8. 2-25
    8:31
    am

    My chickens are laying too. It seems that they “know” when the New Year begins and they start popping out the eggs. Before Christmas, the egg laying is pretty slim pickens’. It’s something they pick up on that is invisible to me. The light seems to be the same. It’s definitely NOT warmer……I’m not sure. But the hens know. It doesn’t matter to me why they start laying again. I’m just glad they are!

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