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Making Friends with Morwen

Dec
18

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Apparently, this is what happens when someone goes back to college and forgets their rat.

It’s disturbing.

*****

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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on December 18, 2013  

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11 Responses
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  1. 12-18
    9:04
    am

    I’m glad to see you and Morwen getting closer…I had a pet rat for a couple of years when my son found a baby “mouse” in the middle of a neighborhood street. Low and behold, she kept growing..especially the nose and tail! She was a smart and affectionate pet. Good for you!!!Keep up the good work. I’m enjoying all your posts and recipes and I lived lots of years in WV. Many years ago I dated a guy whose grandfather lived on Kelly’s Creek. We used to climb the hills and splash around in the Pocatalico. I hope to move back to WV within a few years.

  2. 12-18
    10:03
    am

    I had a hooded rat just like Morwen when I was in high school. My psychology teacher offered him to me after we did a maze study. He was only as big as a pecan when I got him. For 3 years he was a wonderful, entertaining little pet. I named him lambchop because he reminded me of the puppet. Only after he developed a tumor and I took him to the vet did I find out Lambchop was a female. No wonder she was always so gentle. They only live 3 years so don’t get too attached.

  3. 12-18
    10:09
    am

    disturbing. . . for you or Morwen? Will you be able to relinquish that rodent after Christmas?

  4. 12-18
    10:12
    am

    I think “someone” had that figured out from the beginning!! Morwen, you’re a lucky rat!! In my case, it was an iguana. Ew.

  5. 12-18
    12:27
    pm

    :duck:
    Suzanne ~ somehow this brings to mind the Anglican Hymn “All Things Bright and Beautiful”.

    The hymn was first published in Alexander’s Hymns for Little Children. It consists of a series of stanzas that elaborate upon verses of the Apostles’ Creed. It goes as follows:
    ************************************************************

    1. All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small,
    All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all.

    2. Each little flower that opens, Each little bird that sings, He made their glowing colors, He made their tiny wings.

    …3. The rich man in his castle, The poor man at his gate, God made them high and lowly, And ordered their estate.

    …4. The purple headed mountain, The river running by, The sunset and the morning, That brightens up the sky.

    …5. The cold wind in the winter,
    The pleasant summer sun, The ripe fruits in the garden,−He made them every one.

    …6. The tall trees in the greenwood, The meadows where we play, The rushes by the water, We gather every day.

    …7. He gave us eyes to see them, And lips that we might tell, How great is God Almighty, Who has made all things well. …(Amen)

  6. 12-18
    4:24
    pm

    So proud of you Suzanne…good job!

  7. 12-18
    7:47
    pm

    IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII don’t know, he wouldn’t be safe here. I have TOO many wild rats that eat all my chicken feed they can get their mouths on not to mention the duck eggs when they have the chance. Sorry, I don’t like them.

  8. 12-19
    7:43
    am

    Yeah right S. The love in your eyes is showing!!!

  9. 12-19
    1:11
    pm

    You know you are going to keep that rat forever. You are already in love with it.

  10. 12-19
    2:21
    pm

    “Forgot” ? I think not.

  11. 12-20
    2:48
    am

    The lab rats are actually very smart, clean and beautiful creatures. I had a Wilber. He loved to snuggle under my hair at the back of my neck and stay there for hours if he could. He loved to give me kisses. I was 17, and am still alive 33 years later, and he kissed me lots :). Sadly they do get tumors, probably due to all the horrific testing they were subject to for so many years their gene’s are messed up. And yes they live about three years. However, Suzzane….we need more details on this amazing accomplishment. How did you go from being freaked right out to actually touching him that fast? I love it!

    Dana Mama :)

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