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Surprise Drop Hole

Jan
29

Feels like spring here today–I’ve got the heat off and the windows open!

Meanwhile, back in the barn, whenever Adam is here, he moves 20 bales or so of hay down from the loft to keep it handy near the hay feeder in the back of the barn.
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When the hay was loaded into the barn last summer and fall, it was all in before that hay feeder was built and the idea arose that getting hay down through a drop hole would be handy. Adam was going to cut one as soon as enough hay was fed out to get to the right spot. Well, what do you know but he looked up in the barn yesterday and realized there was a piece of plywood nailed down over a drop hole that was already there!
IMG_6767
He took the plywood cover off it and now I have my drop hole!
IMG_6770
Perfect!

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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on January 29, 2013  

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Comments

13 Responses
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  1. 1-29
    10:50
    am

    Just be careful not to drop through the drophole yourself!

  2. 1-29
    11:24
    am

    And the next job on his list is to put a door over the hay drop right?? Those things scare the heck out of me! Even with it shut I get tingles in my legs when I walk by….and yes, I hate heights :yes:

  3. 1-29
    12:54
    pm

    Serendipity!

  4. 1-29
    1:17
    pm

    Oh dear please do be extremely careful up there with that hole! Just gives me the shivers and make my stomach sick to imagine…… :hole:

  5. 1-29
    2:42
    pm

    Yes, I get the creepy crawlies thinking about you falling through–it’s wonderfully convenient but easy to get hurt.

  6. 1-29
    2:44
    pm

    Can you hang a bright colored flag, ball, whatever from the roof above it so it’s really obvious? Like the danglers they use to keep people from running into the garage wall.

  7. 1-29
    4:04
    pm

    Yes, or spray paint around the hole with a bright color. Accidents do happen!

  8. 1-29
    4:14
    pm

    just have Adan cut a piece of 3/4 inch plywood reinforced w / a couple of cut to size 2/4″s. A set of heavy hinges and no worries. Its easy when you are moving heavy bales.or removing twine or bailing wire to forget about the hole.You could probably catch yourself by your underarms but it would probably dislocate you shoulders and who knows how long you could hang there. you couldnt get to your cell and sweet cakes or naughty cow sure won’t come to help. Definately don’t count on goosey gander after you removed all his :dancingmonster: paramours! !!!!

  9. 1-29
    4:20
    pm

    Everyone, please stop worrying about the hole. It was just opened up and there is still hay around it. It will be taken care of.

  10. 1-29
    6:29
    pm

    Not worried. Glad you have a drop hole! Awesome! I have faith that you (as a farmer) will not fall through the hole and become a new version of Alice! :)

  11. 1-29
    8:16
    pm

    LOL at GrammieEarth! :heart:

  12. 1-29
    8:28
    pm

    You should have a chute built around it or a railing. Mine have chutes that go up almost to the ceiling so you can drop the bales when you’re on top of all that hay.

  13. 1-30
    9:14
    am

    Love your pictures of the drop hole and your barn!!! So convenient and necessary but I agree – do be careful. I myself fell through ours when I was a kid – my mother told me it was quite serious though I don’t remember – go figure!

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