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Homemade Hot Dogs

Submitted by: cnbash on September 18, 2010
0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5
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Homemade Hot Dogs

On a quest to find a preservative-free, low sodium replacement for the wiener that has a first name AND a last name, I tried this recipe. They taste wonderful, but are challenging to make. Makes a fun experiment to try with teenagers…their ongoing dialogue will keep you laughing through the frustration of getting the meat into the casings. Be forewarned, these do not look like grocery store hot dogs after cooking! The meat also makes a pretty doggone good meatball if you, like me, tire of trying to get it into the casings.

Attribution Link

Difficulty: Intermediate

Servings: 12-16, depending on your casing size

Prep Time: 1 hour   Cook Time: 20 minutes  

Ingredients

3 feet sheep or small (1-1/2-inch diameter) hog casings
1 pound lean pork, cubed
3/4 pound lean beef, cubed
1/4 pound pork fat, cubed
1/4 cup very finely minced onion
1 small clove garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon finely ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon ground mace
1/2 teaspoon ground mustard seed
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 teaspoon freshly fine ground white pepper
1 egg white
1-1/2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/4 cup milk

Directions

Prepare the casings as per directions on package. In a blender or food processor, make a puree of the onion, garlic, coriander, marjoram, mace, mustard seed, and paprika. Add the pepper, egg white, sugar, salt, and milk and mix thoroughly.

Grind the pork, beef, and fat cubes through the fine blade separately. Mix together and grind again. Mix the seasonings into the meat mixture with your hands. This tends to be a sticky procedure, so wet your hands with cold water first.

Chill the mixture for half an hour then put the mixture thorough the fine blade of the grinder once more. Stuff the casings and twist them off into six-inch links. Parboil the links (without separating them) in gently simmering water for 20 minutes. Place the franks in a bowl of ice water and chill thoroughly. Remove, pat dry, and refrigerate. Because they are precooked, they can be refrigerated for up to a week or they can be frozen.

Categories: Low-Sodium, Other Main Dish, Other Special Diets, Sandwiches

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Reviews

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  1. 9-18
    10:04
    am
    Avatar of Mrs.Turkey

    Towlady…..I am not sure of where you live but if there is a Amish homestead near you and they sell meats etc….that would be good place to perhaps find natural hot dogs without added “no no’s” such as nitrite etc. Be worth checking out anyway.
    Mrs. Turkey~Maine

    • 9-20
      2:04
      pm
      Avatar of LK

      I posted two other recipes in Farm Bell Recipes. One is homemade hot dogs and the other is homemade frankfurters. We like the latter better and will be making them this fall.

  2. 1-9
    2:41
    pm
    Avatar of Ross

    I have lately become much interested in sausage making and foud this link: http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/index.htm
    It will tell you almost everything you ever want to know about this effort. I am so glad to know that there are others that pursue this aspect of food preparation.

    • 1-10
      2:42
      am
      Avatar of bonita

      Ross, One of the best references available is Charcuterie, The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing; Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn, WW Norton & Co, New York © 2005
      Great recipes, great general info, excellent illustrations when needed, and a source list.
      Can you tell I luv this book?

  3. 1-10
    1:19
    am
    Avatar of bonita

    Ross, One of the best references available is Charcuterie, The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn, WW Norton & Co, New York © 2005

    Great recipes, great general info, excellent illustrations when needed, and a source list.

    Can you tell I luv this book?

    • 1-10
      2:59
      pm
      Avatar of Ross

      Bonita, Thanks for the reference. I shall look for it. I came across this website recently and found it to be comprehensive. I never rely on only one source of information.
      Your work looks like it has a skilled hand behind it.

  4. 1-10
    3:16
    pm
    Avatar of Ross

    Bonita, I forgot to include a link. http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/index.htm
    Ross

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