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Self-Rising Flour
April 12, 2009
2:53 pm
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Pete
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Self-Rising Flour

1 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt

Makes 1 cup.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

April 13, 2009
5:39 am
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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I just saw this yesterday somewhere (haven't a clue where) and forgot to copy it, thank you!!!!!!

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

April 13, 2009
9:37 am
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WV_Hills
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Thanks, Pete –

It's great to have choices. The ingredients of self-rising flour are pretty simple. Suzanne's recipe for Quick Mix uses the same principle - mixing the dry ingredients early makes it quick and easy to use. (You can find her recipe by checking the blog Cooking Index - it's second from the left on the bar at the top of each page. Suzanne's posts also include suggestions for using the mix.

Here's the recipe:

5 cups all-purpose flour (may subsitute 1-2 cups whole grain flour as part of the mix)
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup baking powder
1 1/4 teaspoons cream of tartar
1 teaspoon salt

Suzanne's recipe adds sugar (but you can leave it out) and cream of tartar (for a little extra “uumph” in the rising) and makes a larger quantity, but it works well.

When you look at the bags of flour in the baking aisle of your supermarket, and see the bag with “Self-rising Flour” on the labor, now you know what the bag contains. The whole point? You don't need to pay someone extra to put the baking powder and salt in the flour for you. It's just too simple.

Thanks Pete - we needed to have this information.

April 13, 2009
10:49 am
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Pete
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Don't use self-rising flour here, but then we grind our own for the most part.

We did mix up a batch of Suzanne's Quick Mix using winter white wheat berries (they are supposed to be softer than the red, which is what we use for bread) and the biscuits were just dandy.  We made them reather small, and will continue to make small ones.  They were sooo light and flakie that large ones would probably just not hold together at all well.  Some of that was probably the butter and some the wheat used.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

April 16, 2009
4:32 pm
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Belladonna
Bossier City, Louisiana
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I am so glad to have that Pete ...there have been times I wanted to make something and didn't have the self rising flour. YIPPEE!!! Thank you!

April 16, 2009
5:29 pm
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GeorgiaZ
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Pete said:

Don't use self-rising flour here, but then we grind our own for the most part.

We did mix up a batch of Suzanne's Quick Mix using winter white wheat berries (they are supposed to be softer than the red, which is what we use for bread) and the biscuits were just dandy.  We made them reather small, and will continue to make small ones.  They were sooo light and flakie that large ones would probably just not hold together at all well.  Some of that was probably the butter and some the wheat used.


Now Pete you have my wonderin up...white wheat berries and red wheat berries. Do they make red flour? what kind makes brown wheat flower? And how small are they to not fall apart? I make my husband one huge bisquit and me a couple of regular ones. But he just crumbles it all up in a huge Jethro bowl and drowns it in gravy. I want mine to stay together, but they wont. Such dilemas I am having these days. Im plum tuckered out with it all!

April 16, 2009
7:32 pm
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Pete
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Well, G, the most difficult thing about using wheat berries is getting the pits out...   Cool

In all seriousness, all the wheat I have seen is essentially brown.  If you were to line up the different berries, the "red" ones are a reddish brown, the "white" ones are a lighter brown, etc.  Then you have "hard" or "soft" berries.  The softer wheat is what you want for quick breads and things you want less gluten development, if I recall the explanation for it.  The darker and/or harder the wheat, the more gluten is supposed to result.

It's not quite that simple, but that's the short version.  And why cracked wheat doesn't support itself in the development of a bread dough.  There just isn't enough gluten available to make all those strands into a structure within the dough to keep it risen until it has baked.

We used a large juice glass to cut our biscuits - smaller than a normal biscuit cutter, maybe 2 inches across.  Actually, they still crimbled a bit, but were small enough that you could get most of it down before it became a problem!

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

April 16, 2009
8:33 pm
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Jayne
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Pete, you're going to think I'm really asking a stupid question, but hey, it's not the worse thing I've ever done.

When I buy honeywheatberry bread in the store (sorry, not a breadmaker here)  the "berry" part doesn't refer to raspberries then, it refers to the wheatberry?  I love that bread!  It has such a good taste to it. 

April 16, 2009
10:03 pm
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Pete
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Just guessing because you never know what sort of marketing device could be in play here, BUT, they may be trying to tell us or at least convince us that they are using whole wheat berries (the seeds) that have been soaked long enough to soften them, aka "sprouted."  These sprouted wheat berries really are good in bread, and up the cost considerably.

"Sprouted" in bread making really doesn't mean what it does in gardening, I learned recently.  Had thought for years that sprouted breads contained the sprouts (as we know them in gardening or even as sprouts to eat on a salad) of whatever they put into the bread.  Sounded healthy and even good (I DO like Ezekiel bread) but it never tasted to me like it had sprouts in it.  No wonder!  There aren't any sprouts in there, just softened seeds!

I am hardly an expert in bread making, Jayne, but am learning all the time.  It is fascinating.  And few of us learn much without asking questions!   Cool

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

April 16, 2009
10:35 pm
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GeorgiaZ
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Thank you Jayne! I just knew they would think I was joking by asking about berries. But I really thought of it in my mind as some kind of pretty red berry. I just got to quit thinking!French

April 16, 2009
10:53 pm
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Pete
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Maybe if you thought of them auburn and strawberry blond instead...  

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

April 17, 2009
8:53 am
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Jayne
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Pete, I know this bread I buy is full of texture, seeds and stuff through out.  It's used alot in deli's.  I just know it has great taste and I love it.

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