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Regional vocabulary, just for fun
August 19, 2011
4:18 pm
TeaCup
New England
Mighty Chicken
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DH (grew up in the midwest) and I (grew up in CA) have struggled with this . Here's the differences we've found that I didn't see listed elswhere in the thread (I scanned the posts.)

 

yellowjacket

me: yellow wasp, with or without black striping on backend

DH: bumblebee with a yellow "vest"

 

mittens

me: knitted gloves (I'd never seen what DH called mittens before I was about 35!)

DH: gloves, knitted or not, without fingers

 

Also there are these that we've noticed having lived in New England, FL, and CA:

CA: chili size – open faced hamburger with chili over it, topped with cheese melted under a grill

Unknown everywhere else!

milk shake Called a "frappe" in New England, and they add syrup to it and/or make it with soft ice cream, not to mention that many people here have no idea wtf a "malt" is?

 

There's others, but that's what I remember off the top!

 

Judi

shedding stuff like mad!
August 20, 2011
7:23 am
cincyjojo
Mason, OH
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Here in Cincinnati we say, "please?" (instead of huh? or what did you say?).  We sat on the couch or davenport, drank pop, carried a purse but Oma (grandmother) carried her pocketbook.  My 1st husband says, "you-uns".  My sister's husband (from Alabama) says, "might could" (response to can you do something for me?) and everything is a Coke.  I noticed friends in MO call everything a soda.  I went to WV on vacation as a teenager and came back saying, "Winceday" instead of Wednesday.  My cousin used to say warsh and my daddy would always ask her how to spell it…she became a speach therapist (LOL).  I always got a kick out of the African-American kids saying, "hecky-no-shoot".  If I remember correctly, it meant they didn't like something when the question was asked.

I love the backwards speak.  It will be great to use when speaking to my teenagers in front of their friends!  It beats throwing my back out trying to imitate their dancing.

Maybe someone out there has heard this saying (I believe it is a southern phrase), "Good Gordon John!".

By the way, what is this new slang saying, "I know, right"?  They should just say, eh, like in Canada.

March 17, 2012
12:15 pm
BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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I thought I'd revive this with another question…Lunch or Dinner or Supper?

In our house, if it's a small work-a-day meal in the middle of the day it's Lunch, a larger meal, most usually a bit PAST noon is Dinner.  Supper is the last meal of the day… though it's all rather flexible.  Almost any fancier or more formal meal is dinner though.  This can get really confusing eh? 

(sorry, someone earlier made a comment about eh being a Canadian thing, but I used to work with two guys who were from the UP of Michigan, and they said it a LOT!)

Located in N.E. Ohio
March 17, 2012
12:40 pm
lavenderblue
WNY
Mighty Chicken
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According to mom, dinner was the noon meal on Sundays and if you were having company over at suppertime during the week. If she had to make it fresh for other people, in other words. If it was just for family during the week or if it was leftovers, then it was supper in the evening.  Very often lunch was just called the 'noon meal', as in "RALPH! What would you like for your noon meal?"

Now with all of us working odd hours (my son) or busy with teen stuff (my daughter) breakfast, lunch and dinner are all called "Do you have time to eat anything?"

Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long.  Ogden Nash
March 17, 2012
1:18 pm
fairwindsfarmgal
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March 12, 2012
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Well, here's another regional saying: "I'm fixin' to go to the barn." or I'm about to go to the barn. 

March 17, 2012
3:01 pm
charchar
Ft Scott, KS
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I am one of those who has lived in or had influence from all corners of the states.  Mama grew up in Minnesota and then in Washington; Daddy grew up in California where he entered the navy.  My first language influences were from Georgia, where the majority of my childhood memories are from, but have spent 15 years in Oregon and the past 2 years in Kansas.  

We always had a couch; didn't even hear someone call it a divan until I met my MIL.  Her and her husband are from Iowa, and have lived in the Midwest the majority of their 70 years.  You want to add a little frustration to the whole thing, go from the speed of Portland, Oregon to a family in Kansas who starts every sentence of their conversation with a very slow, "weeeeell…..," and then wait another minute for them to throw any other words in. Life slows down in the "Four States".  

I grew up eating breakfast lunch and dinner. My MIL eats breakfast, dinner and supper. Can't tell you how many times that has messed us up.  

Growing up in GA, we called it all coke, and people would ask us, what kind?  When we moved to Washington (or Warshington, as my mother's family calls it), everybody called it pop.  If I order a coke here, I get a Coca Cola. I also learned my y'all from GA. It may not seem proper, but at least it's a contraction, unlike my in-law's youse. "Wutter youse goin' ta have fer dinner?" "We are going to have tunafish sandwiches for lunch."

I didn't even know people called a purse by any other name. Something they say in the midwest is, billfold.  A man's wallet is not a wallet…it's a billfold. He ain't got no bills in there, though, so why?

Oh, I haven't seen this one mentioned. Totally threw me off when I moved here. My FIL said that he needed to get a new stool.  I asked my husband later, why his dad needed a stool.  He's tall and 70 yrs old, why would he need a stool?  My husband looked at me strangely, then I saw it click in his head, and he responded, "Haven't you ever heard a toilet called a stool?"  I told him what from a toilet I had heard called stool, but never the toilet itself.  I still find that very strange.  

Also from the midwest as far as I can tell, you do not go to Wal*Mart. You go to the Wal*Mart.  Or Wal*Mark as a lot of them call it around here. 

March 17, 2012
3:08 pm
Ross
Bel Air Maryland
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I get ready , I am ready , I'm going, I'm fixin' the tractor because I am getting ready to plow. Yankees guess and southerners reckon so I am told.

March 17, 2012
4:18 pm
princessvanessa
University Place, WA
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couch and dinner

Mom had her purse and as much as she tried to say "wash" she often reverted back to "warsh" and she was born/raised/lived in western Washington.  Only thing I can figure is that "her" mother was from Missouri. Don't they pronounce more like "Missoura"?

We drank pop when we were lucky enough to have it, which was usually when we knew we were having company or relatives were staying over.

drainboard instead of countertop

breadboard instead of cuttingboard

cupboards "pronounced more like cubboards" instead of kitchen cabinets

Grandpa Lof (originally from Sweden) called the car a "puddle-jumper" and the trunk lid a "turtleback"

Grandpa Lof would sometimes have some "pie" after dinner…a slice of buttered white bread with hot creamed corn overtop. 

My prince charming took a wrong turn, got lost, and is too stubborn to ask for directions.
March 17, 2012
5:24 pm
Joell
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When my Family came back from overseas, I heard people thalk abou mangos, I was so happy to know they grew them here in the states--little did I know there were talking about green peppers.  laugh

Chocolate is a perfect substance in an imperfect world.
March 17, 2012
8:55 pm
BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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Really Joell?  I've never heard green peppers called mangos!  Where is that the most common?  Gotta love learning new stuff!

Located in N.E. Ohio
March 17, 2012
11:44 pm
NotStuckinMiamiAnymore
Miami, Florida
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charchar said

We always had a couch; didn't even hear someone call it a divan until I met my MIL.  Her and her husband are from Iowa, and have lived in the Midwest the majority of their 70 years.  You want to add a little frustration to the whole thing, go from the speed of Portland, Oregon to a family in Kansas who starts every sentence of their conversation with a very slow, "weeeeell…..," and then wait another minute for them to throw any other words in. Life slows down in the "Four States".  

Hahaha! My grandmother was from Arkansas and she called her couch a davenport!

I know what you mean by moving from Portland where everyone moves quick as lighting and is friendly as could be. Down here in Miami it is the complete opposite! I got deeply insulted by one of my son's teachers last year when we arrived. When I explained to her that we are from Portland and that I am just getting my bearings in regards to driving around the area, she started talking about how Miami is such a major "metropolitan" [think snobby accent] area. Whereas, we were from an area full of "rolling hills and quaint villages". I was dumbfounded! The audacity of the woman! So of course I laid it on thick!!! I broke out in the deepest country accent and told how "them thar injuns were a mighty big trubbles." "Laud knos the mools 'er stubbern, too. They hates them hitchin posts."

Man do I miss Portland and her weirdos.

But I was teased in Portland for using the word "Hankering". I was too country there too!sun2

If there was any logic in this world, it would be men who ride side-saddle, not women.
March 18, 2012
9:06 am
Miss Judy
West Central MO
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BuckeyeGirl said
Really Joell?  I've never heard green peppers called mangos!  Where is that the most common?  Gotta love learning new stuff!

 

BG…I think it's funny you've never heard that…southeastern Ohio …where I grew up …particulary Morgan County. That's the only place I've lived that calls them that.

March 18, 2012
10:36 am
mamawolf
Colorado Springs
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My mother was born and raised in Colorado and she also referred to bell peppers as mangos.  I got a rude awakening when I moved to California and shopped for "mangos"!  I spent one summer in the Smokies as a child and they referred to "pop" as "dope".  Strange.

Work like you don't need the money, love like you've never been hurt and dance like you do when no one is watching.
March 18, 2012
10:57 am
BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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Well, I've lived/traveled all over the country, thanks to working for a horse trainer as a kid and traveling around a couple different horse show circuits, then joining the AF, and traveling more still, I thought I'd heard most of these things, and I've never heard that one!  Pretty interesting! 

Also being in my 50's I've heard a lot of the older terms… For family parties we used to get those wooden crates of the various flavors of small bottles.  We also grew up calling pop, pop, but now I call it soda most of the time, it's just more clear no matter where you go.  Never heard it called dope!

Funny stuff!

Located in N.E. Ohio
March 18, 2012
11:48 am
Joell
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BuckeyeGirl said
Really Joell?  I've never heard green peppers called mangos!  Where is that the most common?  Gotta love learning new stuff!

Yes--I  also am suprised that living in Ohio you have never heard green peppers called mangos--when we lived in Ohio, that was used by every one I was around, and by my family  in WVA as well.

Chocolate is a perfect substance in an imperfect world.
March 18, 2012
11:51 am
easygoinglady
N.E. Ohio
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Miss Judy said

BuckeyeGirl said
Really Joell?  I've never heard green peppers called mangos!  Where is that the most common?  Gotta love learning new stuff!

 

BG…I think it's funny you've never heard that…southeastern Ohio …where I grew up …particulary Morgan County. That's the only place I've lived that calls them that.

Yes! My grandparents were from Morgan county, and they always called them mangoes. My grandmother was a school teacher in Morgan county. Good chance you might have had her if you went to McConnelsville school. I so loved going their in the summer and being on their farm. And my other grandfather had a farm in Pennsville. Hes been gone many years, but i so remember he had no indoor plumbing and having to use the outhouse! He did have the luxury of a pump at the kitchen sink, lol. 

March 18, 2012
4:52 pm
charchar
Ft Scott, KS
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StuckinMiami said  I know what you mean by moving from Portland where everyone moves quick as lighting and is friendly as could be. Down here in Miami it is the complete opposite! I got deeply insulted by one of my son's teachers last year when we arrived. When I explained to her that we are from Portland and that I am just getting my bearings in regards to driving around the area, she started talking about how Miami is such a major "metropolitan" [think snobby accent] area. Whereas, we were from an area full of "rolling hills and quaint villages". I was dumbfounded! The audacity of the woman! So of course I laid it on thick!!! I broke out in the deepest country accent and told how "them thar injuns were a mighty big trubbles." "Laud knos the mools 'er stubbern, too. They hates them hitchin posts."

Man do I miss Portland and her weirdos.

But I was teased in Portland for using the word "Hankering". I was too country there too!sun2

Wow, when we lived in FL and GA, I don't remember anyone being like that.  But then, we were always on or very near the navy bases, so there were probably too many "transplants" (as they're called in NC) to have any attitude.  That, and when we were in GA, there were soooo many backwoods, hick, and very, very down-to-earth country people, that that "locals" attitude really didn't happen.  

I was too country for Portland, too.  Everyone always thought I was from Texas just because I said "y'all".  I do not miss the weirdos, though, gotta tell ya.  I fit in much more around these here parts.  The slower life takes a lot of getting used to, even now, but I'll take it for all this free sun that I get!!!! sun2 I hate constant overcast!  and wearing a jacket in the middle of summer.  I do wish the beach was a little closer though….

March 18, 2012
4:54 pm
charchar
Ft Scott, KS
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Oh, and I miss the availability of different cheeses and good sushi!  Can't beat that in Portland, Oregon!  Fresh fish and Tillamook cheese!!sleepy-cow

March 20, 2012
1:01 pm
kdubbs
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My family's Pennsylvania Dutch.  We've got words that aren't even English!

March 20, 2012
1:18 pm
Ross
Bel Air Maryland
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kdubbs said
My family's Pennsylvania Dutch.  We've got words that aren't even English!

 

All of us have words that aren't english. Running amok(malay) in the boondoks (tagalog,P.I.) means that you have gone off your rocker out in the hills.

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