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Bringing Herbs Indoors for the Winter
October 28, 2012
2:03 pm
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joykenn
Illinois
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Is it possible to transplant some of my healthy outdoor herbs into a pot and bring indoors for a sunny window?  Anyone know what might "take" and what I can forget about?  Any tips?

December 1, 2012
10:31 pm
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lavenderblue
WNY
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This year I'm planning to bring in a rosemary, a thyme, some stevia, two lemon verbena, a tarragon, and maybe a winter savory, although that lasted fine outside all last winter.  I grow most of these in pots already, though. Last year my thyme didn't last long in the house. I don't know why.

The lemon verbena I will water well and put in the basement. It loses it leaves and goes a little dormant in the winter. I mostly ignore it until sometime in the early spring.  Everything else will hopefully fit under my grow light by my kitchen sink. My house has no natural light bright enough.   If your window is super warm and sunny, maybe you won't need artificial light. If it is not, you can supplement by using a grow light in a clip on work light if you don't have a overhead fixture. They like six to eight hours of bright light IIRC. Mine get a lot because I forget to turn off the light.

My grow lights are regular under the cupboard fixtures that my husband put grow lights in. I suspect that what he bought was reptile lights but I believe they are the same thing.

As for other herbs, if I can find the room and a way to keep the cats out of it, I'd like to start some parsley and basil from seed and maybe bring in a small pot of chives.

Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long.  Ogden Nash

December 1, 2012
10:32 pm
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lavenderblue
WNY
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Oh, and if I remember right they also like the artificial lights quite close, like only six inches away. If they are getting too long, leggy and ugly looking, trim them back and either get some grow lights if you aren't already using them or move the grow lights closer down to them if you are.

Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long.  Ogden Nash

December 1, 2012
10:33 pm
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MrsFuzz
Colorado
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Sorry it took me so long to see this.  What kind of herbs are they, Joy?  At the risk of sounding pedantic, some herbs are annual and some are perennial.  You can certainly bring them inside.  Most your perennial herbs like 8+ hrs a day of good light, and dry feet.  But what zone do you live in?  Your perennials may over-winter just fine, depending on what varietal they are.  If they have southern exposure & are in a protected area, you may be able to get them through the winter with deep mulch.  Lots of options!

If you do end up potting, please make sure to read some of the links I put in this sub forum in regards to container gardening & container soils.  It will give you the best chance at good results with your plants.

Wearing cowboy boots does not make one an agriculturist….Having at least 3 varieties of poop on them does.

December 1, 2012
10:33 pm
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joykenn
Illinois
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Thanks you guys.  I thought I'd bring in some oregano to have in the kitchen to cook with and possibly some parsley and lemon thyme.  My goal is not so much to keep them until next year but have some fresh herbs for as long as possible.

I'm in the Chicago area so winters are bad!  Strangely enough an oregano plant I put into a corner of my front (Northern) flower bed has grown, spread and comes back strong each year–and I've tried cutting it back!  Strange since I didn't think being covered with a couple of feet of snow was good for oregano.

Also I have mint gone wild all over the place–especially where I don't want it.  Fresh mint is a nice treat and I sure have lots of it.  Any chance for it–if not I'll be glad to kill a bit more of it!wink

December 1, 2012
10:34 pm
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MrsFuzz
Colorado
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You must have some HARDY oregano!  Although, snow acts as a great insulator, so that may be part of what's helping.

The oregano & lemon thyme will do fine inside, but the parsley probably won't.  I've never heard of anyone having much luck transplanting it.  You could start some inside in a good-sized pot if you really want parsley.   :)  Good luck!

Wearing cowboy boots does not make one an agriculturist….Having at least 3 varieties of poop on them does.

December 2, 2012
3:07 pm
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rooster run
wood county , wv
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I live in WV and I always bring the rosemary and parsley in for the winter. They do well in my kitchen, but it gets the morning sun. The hard part is keeping them watered enough. There is so much sun that they dry out too fast. Mint does well also. I grow oregano but just cut a lot and dry it instead of bringing it indoors. If you have room it is easier to just grow what you want to bring in in pots, that way you avoid the transplant stage and they do better, less shock.

August 12, 2013
6:43 am
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claudedesuza
Hatchling
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August 12, 2013
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I too have oregano in my kitchen, and they are doing good without having any problem.

August 17, 2013
8:46 pm
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Joelle
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joykenn said

Thanks you guys.  I thought I'd bring in some oregano to have in the kitchen to cook with and possibly some parsley and lemon thyme.  My goal is not so much to keep them until next year but have some fresh herbs for as long as possible.

I'm in the Chicago area so winters are bad!  Strangely enough an oregano plant I put into a corner of my front (Northern) flower bed has grown, spread and comes back strong each year–and I've tried cutting it back!  Strange since I didn't think being covered with a couple of feet of snow was good for oregano.

Also I have mint gone wild all over the place–especially where I don't want it.  Fresh mint is a nice treat and I sure have lots of it.  Any chance for it–if not I'll be glad to kill a bit more of it!wink

I know what you mean about oregano, it has spread through out my flower beds, I just trim it low with the weed wacker and let it go, even in our winters it thrives, I dont mind the oregano, but the lemon balm....that is another story, I cant kill that stuff and it had spread even a half acre from the house, I dont firght it anymore---it has won the battle.no

  "Be kinder than necessary, everyone is fighting some sort of battle."

August 18, 2013
12:09 am
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Squeegees Mom
South Texas
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All the volunteer herbs growing in the yard sure do make mowing a scentual pleasure! My previous home had lots of volunteers in the yard. Probably more herbs than grass. It usually kept the deer from getting too close to my garden, as they did not care for the smell of the trampled herbs?

August 18, 2013
9:54 am
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BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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I have volunteer oregano from over 20 years ago across the road in the ditch, we live on a very quiet dead end so I harvest it without worry of it ever having been sprayed or bothered.  There's only two houses down past our house so the traffic is very minimal too!  lol

I had lemon balm in the garden without much spreading for quite a few years but then two springs ago it sort of broke loose and took off...  across the grass!  Mowing that section of grass is now lemony fresh!  I don't mind a bit, and breaking off a sprig and throwing it in the teapot with whatever tea I'm brewing is what I do when I have a stress headache coming on.  For all I know it's a total figment of my imagination that it works, but for me it worksand that's good enough for me.  sun 

 

Located in N.E. Ohio

November 13, 2013
4:59 pm
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dawnrae64
Baltimore
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November 13, 2013
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I'm enjoying reading the comments. I want cilantro indoors but haven't had any luck.

 

I did bring my tomato in from the balcony and it's doing beautifully! (there's a photo on my blog today of some of the tomatoes I ate the other day).  It's a south-west, bright kitchen window and a full spectrum bulb on a timer to add light hours.  I want to add more things to my kitchen garden.

December 29, 2013
2:16 pm
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Armenia Mt Mom
Armenia Mt
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I have tried for two years to bring Rosemary and thyme in our home during winter for cooking.  Each year the herbs get a white powder and dries out then dies.  I use fresh potting soil, and put them in an eastern window.  Not sure what I am doing wrong we live in north central PA at about 2000 ft.  Could altitude be a problem?  Or long dark days?  I have grow lights, should I use them any suggestions would be appreciated!

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