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You know those oniony looking things????
March 1, 2012
1:57 pm
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Junebug
Big Chicken
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May 13, 2010
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This may be silly, but.....you know those things that grow in your yard that look like green onions?  They smell like onions when they are mowed too.  Can you eat them?  Could you at least use the green part like chives?  My yard is just full of them.  Any clues? 

March 1, 2012
3:38 pm
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dee58m
ohio
Mighty Chicken
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hello JuneBug, in answer to your question.. YES, both wild onion and wild garlic are edible. Firstly though to be sure that if you plan to eat them, they must come from locations that you know are free of lawn fertilizers, lawn chemicals and pesticides.

Wild onion has the flatter green growth that you see, the wild onion smells like garlic, it can be used just like the onion you grow in your garden. The wild garlic has more of a round green and will smell like onion. I like to use both. I like to saute the wild garlic in some extra virgin olive oil and use with tomato based dishes or in homemade salad dressings. For the garlic you can blanch it, this will tone down the strong taste if you want it to be more of a milder flavor.

Ours grow more in the shaded areas of our yard, though I do see them in sunny areas too.

It amazes me more and more when I find all the wild edibles in our yard.

As a child growing up in PA, picking bouquets everyday for mom, we were surrounded by Johnny Jump Ups, many call them a wild violet. That has always been my most favorite flower even as an adult. When we moved to our home 35 years ago, I found several packets of Johnny Jump Up seeds at an heirloom seed carrier. We scattered them throughout our yard. I am 58 and still get excited when I see them popping up in the spring. They are great candied, eaten as a snack, used in baking, etc...

Everyones yard can be an organic salad bowl. snuggle

" life is not about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about dancing in the rain"

March 4, 2012
9:16 am
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lavenderblue
WNY
Mighty Chicken
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Not so fast, Junebug!  There are many different EDIBLE things that smell like onions and are related to onions. But when I was a child I remember my mom had a beautiful small white flower that bloomed from a bulb called Star of Bethlehem. She warned us many, many times not to eat it even though it smelled like onions. I may have them growing on the side of my house but haven't been able to definitely identify them. Unfortunately I can't remember what the leaves look like on either my mom's or what I have growing here. And it was only last spring. Nor do I know the Latin name. Your best bet is to find a neighbor who has them in her yard or go to the Extension service.

Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long.  Ogden Nash

March 5, 2012
6:43 pm
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dee58m
ohio
Mighty Chicken
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lavenderblue is this the flower, Star of Bethlehem that you are describing?  I agree that you must know what you are eating wild in your yard. The wild garlic does get a bloom of white flowers, ours is a tight cluster at the top of the narrow green stalk. Our wild onion has never flowered. 

JuneBug, to be sure, do call your county extension office for safe indentification.

" life is not about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about dancing in the rain"

March 5, 2012
8:49 pm
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mountainkat
WV
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December 28, 2011
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My wild onions never bloom either- but they are very, very tasty- especially this time of year.  You can also eat the tops like chives as you suggested- sauteed they are pretty amazing addition to almost anything.  I've been throwing them in quiches for weeks now.

Of course, it's safest to make sure someone else thinks whatever you want to eat is also a "wild onion" and not something dangerous!  And ditto on the pesticides and lawn treatments.  But after that, enjoy!!!

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