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Cheese question
February 3, 2010
5:43 pm
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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I made cultured buttermilk from 2% milk bought at the store. Its made with buttermilk from the store made with mesophilic yeast. I left it out way too long and it curdled and separated. Can I use those curds to make cheese now. Do I just drain and press them? Add salt? Will I need rennet, since its already separated? i stuck it in the fridg efor now.

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 3, 2010
8:26 pm
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BuckeyeGirl
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heh, I was hoping someone would answer this Sheryl.  I know that normally you heat buttermilk (2% up to about 180 deg) to get it to seperate, then strain it and drain it for soft cheese, but I don't know about this case.  I'm going to poke around a bit.

Located in N.E. Ohio

February 4, 2010
6:17 am
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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Thank you, Buckeyegirl. I tried looking aroudn on Google and couldn't find anything.

It has really and truly separated into solid curd at the top and almost clear whey on the bottom.

If it were regular milk, could I make cheese out of the curd?

This was made from 20% homogenized milk from the store.

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 4, 2010
7:53 am
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Pete
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Sherryl, it sounds like it is making itself into cheese whether you want it or not!

Not a cheesemaker AT ALL in any way shape or form here, but what you are describing is exactly what you look for to make cheese isn't it?  Having a lower fat milk base would simply result in a lower fat cheese, wouldn't it?

If you don't make it into cheese, what will you do with it?

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

February 4, 2010
9:33 am
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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Cottage cheese is the next curdling step after buttermilk.  I had this site bookmarked for some reason.........and found this in there.

No-rennet cottage cheese

* 1 gallon milk
* 1 cup cultured buttermilk

Warm the milk to about 95 degrees F. Stir in the buttermilk and allow to set at room temperature for 12 to 18 hours. The milk will clabber, or become thick.

Cut the curds into 1/2-inch cubes and let rest for 10 minutes. Place the pot into a double boiler-type pot and heat at a very low setting until the curd reaches 115 degrees F. Stir often to keep the curds from matting together. This will take an hour or more.

The curd is ready when it is somewhat firm on the interior of the cheese. Cook longer if necessary. Some whey will rise to the top. Let the curds settle to the bottom of the pot, drain off the whey and place the curds in a cloth-lined colander to drain. Be gentle, as the curds are rather fragile.

Allow the cheese to drain until it stops dripping. Place in a bowl and add salt to taste. I usually use about one teaspoon of kosher or canning salt per pound. Stir in about four ounces of half-and-half or cream per pound if you like a creamed cottage cheese.

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

February 4, 2010
9:34 am
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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Well, I think I am going to attempt to make the curd into cheese and see how it goes. I don't have rennet or any quick access to it. We'll see how it goes. This will be my first cheese attempt. I am getting excited about trying it. Maybe I have stumbled on a new cheese...probably not.

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 4, 2010
11:55 am
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LauraP
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Sheryl,

What you have is similar to one of the soft cheese recipes I tried way back when.  If you don't want to cook it, or if the curd just crumbles instead of holding together when you cut it - and that happens sometimes in rennet-less recipes - then you can just drain with cheesecloth until it reaches a texture that suits you for a soft, spreadable cheese.  Use as is or add herbs, garlic, etc.

February 4, 2010
1:01 pm
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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Thank you, Cindy, for the recipe! I think I will try the heating method. I may have some sea salt left from making some sea salt scrub soap. I hope so.

Should I add salt to the uncooked version to prevent rot and mildew?

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 4, 2010
1:09 pm
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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the salt is just for taste.  this is cottage cheese, so it needs to be refrigerated.  or even if you drain it and make a cream cheese type of thing, it still needs to be refridgerated.

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

February 4, 2010
1:19 pm
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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ok. I have it draining in a colander lined with one thickness of cheesecloth. I just now scooped it off the whey. I found cheesecloth at the dollar store! Imagine that!

It doesn't seem to be draining very much. Should I put it in the fridge to drain over night sort of? Will it take that long? Should I leave it out at room temp?

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 4, 2010
1:42 pm
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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A few questions. I found some Junket rennet on EBay. Some sites with recipes say to use Junket rennet and some say it is not as good. What is the difference between Junket rennet and regular rennet?

Should I save the whey? It looks pretty good, sort of clear with a yellow/greenish tinge. That's what good whey is suppose to look like, right?

Does it freeze? I already use sour cream in my biscuits and I don't make much bread from scratch. We don't eat cakes. What else is it good for? I hate to waste it. I know it has a lot of really good things in it.

I am going to try it without heating. I am already making cookies, making lemon squares, starting supper and changing the gravel in the aquarium, at the moment. Heating it would just be too much right now. (I am washing my hands really good after putting them in the aquarium. Not to worry.) I really hate to just sit and wait for the cookies that seem to go on forever, in the oven and out of the oven and in the oven and out of the oven. I also like to use the oven for all that I can while it is on so not to waste the energy. Cheese has to take a back seat but I don't want it to go bad sitting on the counter. It is draining in cheesecloth into a bowl in the fridge.

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 4, 2010
1:43 pm
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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Sheryl, I've never tried what you're doing so I don't know anything about it but it looks like you got some good advice!

As for refrigerating it, I haven't seen refrigerating while draining in any of the recipes I've done.  The cheese sits out while it's draining, at room temp.  That's why since my kids have been watching me make cheese, they now call cheese "rotten milk" LOL.

Clover made me do it.

February 4, 2010
1:47 pm
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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You can freeze whey......no reason not to.  It will be good to use any baking, I'm sure, that calls for water.

As for rennet, I don't know.  I've seen several sites that say junket rennet isn't cheesemaking rennet.  I don't know the difference, all I know is what I've read!

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

February 4, 2010
1:48 pm
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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That helps a lot, Suzanne. Thank you. So I can stop worrying about it going bad on the counter. Should I take it out of the fridge. Will it be better if it ages at room temp? Can I make hard cheese with this in a press?

Well, it is, really, rotten milk, isn't it? I like it anyway :-)

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 4, 2010
2:03 pm
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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Junket rennet is a weak form of rennet, that's why it's not really appropriate for cheesemaking.  You could probably make some soft cheeses with it, I don't know.  I wouldn't--I have cheese rennet and I'd definitely recommend you get some of that if you intend to make a lot of cheeses.  Cheese rennet is five times stronger than junket rennet.

Clover made me do it.

February 4, 2010
2:17 pm
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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That clears up some questions. Thank you! I am definitely going to get some real rennet, somewhere. I know Toronto will have cheese supply stores, probably several. Its about an hour's drive away.

If this makes good cream cheese, I am going to make it this way all the time. I was going to try yogurt cream cheese, but the buttermilk is a lot easier to make since there are no temp requirements.

I have put the whey into little muffin tins lines with plastic and put them in the freezer. When they are hard I will put them all in a bag. I really have to get some ice cube trays!

Thanks for all the help guys! I will let you know how it turns out. Wave

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 4, 2010
3:51 pm
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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RIght now it looks and tastes just like sour cream, which it is without the milkfat. Same bacteria .

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

February 13, 2010
2:35 pm
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Runningtrails - Sheryl
Barrie, Ontario
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This is called "quark". I made quark and didn't even know it!

I have heard of quark before but never bothered to look it up. I am going to start more today!

Sheryl - sherylgallant.blogspot.com - providence-acres.blogspot.com

"Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody."  - 1 Thes. 4:11

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