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Different yeasts?
February 15, 2013
5:40 pm
brookdale
Eastern Maine
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October 17, 2010
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"Instant dry yeast" and "active dry yeast"; are they the same? I checked on the Fleishmann's yeastwebsite but just got confused with all the info.

Do I add the instant yeast to the water for Gr. bread as usual, or mix it in with the flour as it says on the pkg? What is the difference if any?

Also, it says on the website "freezing not recommended" for storage, but I know a lot of you do this, so hope I can too.

Bought 2 big pkg of the instant yeast by mistake, hope I can use it the same way.

Thanks for help. I also posted this on the Farmhouse Table thread.

Remember, if it rains on your picnic it's also raining on your garden!
February 16, 2013
7:05 am
Joell
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 Good morning, I use Flesisman's and SAF yeast and both packages say instant dry yeast. I have to use my machine because I can not do the kneading by hand. I have recipes that call for mixing the yeast with liquid to proof the yeast and others do not. I use my machine for all sorts of dough and have never had any problems with the method of adding the yeast on top of the flour as the last ingriedient before the machine starts. I have always stored my yeast in the freezer as I buy it in large packages but I let the measured amount of yeast come to room temp before I use it.

 If I remember correctly the cakes of yeast that were used years ago had to be mixed with water to be dissolved before using, buy I dont believe this is the case with instant dry yeast. I have never dissolved my yeast in liquid before using.

            I hope this helps, if not there are so many excellent bakers here, I am sure someone can help you.

Chocolate is a perfect substance in an imperfect world.
February 16, 2013
8:05 am
justdeborah2002
ottawa ON
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November 14, 2010
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The point of adding dry yeast to your liquid is to make sure your yeast is still active before you add the bulk of ingredients ie the flour.

So if you are absolutely positively sure that the yeast works, go for it, just add it with the flour.  If you prefer to add it to the liquid (I do), then do so.

 

HTH

queen of make it fit
February 16, 2013
10:11 am
MrsFuzz
Colorado
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July 29, 2009
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Here's the difference between different kinds of yeast:

Active Dry:  This needs to be "proofed" before using.  You have to put it into a warm liquid, and give it a little bit of food (typically honey or sugar) and let it sit for 5-10 minutes to wake it up and get it active & ready to start working.  Think of Active Dry yeast like a squirrel in hibernation.

Instant:  No proofing needed (hence the reason you can add it directly to the flour)!  The squirrel is already awake & ready to go.  You can proof it if you want to, but not necessary.  It just shortens the time necessary to make your dough is all.

Bakers/Cake yeast:  This also needs to be proofed.  This is hard to find, hard to keep, finicky to measure, but probably the most reliable (you know that it's going to rise) yeast.

Active & Instant yeast will last pretty much indefinitely in the freezer, as long as it's air-tight.  Baker's yeast definitely has an expiration date.

Hope this helps!

Wearing cowboy boots does not make one an agriculturist….Having at least 3 varieties of poop on them does.
February 16, 2013
1:39 pm
Ross
Bel Air Maryland
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Dry yeast is not fussy about how you use it..I always mix my flours and salt and sugar and add to that to water and add the yeast to the water. just because it is convenient. I have added the yeast to the flour mix and then added the liquid. I never see any difference. The dough will rise just as reliably in a cool kitchen as in a very warm summtime kitchen or overnight in the fridge.

 

February 18, 2013
3:16 pm
brookdale
Eastern Maine
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October 17, 2010
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Thanks, folks, for the info. Mrs.Fuzz, I will remember the squirrel!

I did notice when I opened the instant dry yeast that it was a little finer ground than the active dry yeast. I put it into canning jars and put it in the freezer. It will probably last me the rest of my life! Now I have to make more bread…

Remember, if it rains on your picnic it's also raining on your garden!
February 20, 2013
12:55 pm
Ross
Bel Air Maryland
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A note on long term storage of yeast. I buy my yeast in 2 pound packages of vacuum packed one pound foil bags. I open only one at a time and leave the other in the pantry. I carefully rolled the top of the bag down tightly on the yeast and hold it closed with a rubber band. This excludes any extra air. I store the bag in the freezer and opent only long enough to measure out what I need and immediately return it to the freezer. Moisture and oxygen will distroy the yease but freezing doesn't. At present I am on the last of a bag that I opened two years ago. Its mate is still on the shelf.

February 20, 2013
5:25 pm
joykenn
Illinois
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August 23, 2010
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I think yeast companies like Fleishmanns and SAF err on the side of caution in their directions.  Like Ross you can probably get away with keeping yeast for a long time, freezing it, storing it in the fridge, not proofing it.  BUT officially they give warning on the packages.  That said…

It doesn't really take any time to proof your yeast.  Put it in warm water, add some honey or sugar, and then go on to measure your other ingredients while it wakes up and "stretches" some.  Of course if you're using a bread machine where you put yeast on top of the flour you are taking a little bit of a chance that old yeast might not be a strong (or whatever you call it) as fresh yeast.   BUT the yeast doesn't explode or turn color or smell off if its past its use-by date. Some of the little yeasties might have died after a year or so in the freezer but there are plenty more to grow and make your bread rise in that spoonful.

February 20, 2013
9:35 pm
Ross
Bel Air Maryland
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I have a friend in the sugar packaging business. He tells me that a "use by date" is required by the FDA on everything including sugar and salt, The oldest preservatives in the world. if you bake frequently  you can proof your yeast every 3 to 4 months and be fine. Just keep it dry, air tight and frozen.

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