Hay the Hard Way

Aug
26

This time last year, I already had most of my hay in the barn and was getting ready to finish up with the final haul. Fast forward to this year, end of August, and I had no hay in the barn, for various reasons. If I have one problem, I have ten, it seems. Everyone who would normally be helping me is working full-time, for one thing. Near constant rain this summer has also been an issue. My own truck, the old blue pickup Ross gave me, is broken down at the moment–seeming to take away even my own ability to haul hay.


I do expect to have help available in the fall, but that’s pretty late to wait to get as much hay as I need. It was making me nervous. If I was going to have all the hay I want, I needed to get started, lay in at least some of it, somehow, before the summer is over.

This weekend, I had one way to get it.
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And one person to help me.
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My favorite hay barn:
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Hay man: “You gotta do what you gotta do.” Yeah.
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I can get 11 bales of hay in my Explorer.
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Front seat passenger:
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My passenger was drinking or something because every time I’d go around a curve, I’d get smacked. Back at the farm, I’d unload.
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Morgan got the bales up the loft stairs. Even the hay elevator is not up yet.

Believe it or not, I brought 55 bales of hay home this way this weekend. At one point, I was ready to have a meltdown. At one point, Morgan was ready to have a meltdown. She’s either at school or in Texas when I usually get hay, so she’s never helped in the hay before.

But in the end, we did it. Just us two girls.
IMG_9603
Cuz you gotta do what you gotta do.

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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on August 26, 2013  

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Comments

16 Responses | RSS feed for comments on this post

  1. 8-26
    9:55
    am

    Woman Power!!

  2. 8-26
    9:57
    am

    Can your farm wagon be hitched to your explorer. I am sure it is not road licensed, but if your supply is not too far away, give it a try.

  3. 8-26
    10:09
    am

    You go girl! that is worthy of a case of Miller I’m sure! Man I bet you two were wiped out! hot and cranky as all get out! I would invest in a trailer hitch for sure! load that sucker up an pull it on down the road. You inspire us to be better women! take a much deserved rest today…..

  4. 8-26
    10:44
    am

    We’re always heard “Where there’s a will there’s a way.” I prefer “Where there’s a woman there’s a way!” You go, Girls!

  5. 8-26
    11:21
    am

    Been there! AMEN!

  6. 8-26
    12:13
    pm

    Wondering if you could heave a few bales on top (luggage rack) without roof collapsing. I would also use a tarp or heavy plastic sheet to cover where your bales will be sitting upon. Nothing like at the end of a task to become a Yankee Do Doll. :moo:

  7. 8-26
    12:19
    pm

    Wow! Sorry to hear about the blue truck. I guess you’ll need to find some hired men to help bring more over if everyone else is working or away at school. Maybe Weston could come home for a weekend and help? Labor day (3 day weekend) is coming up! He could bring a few fellows to help and their trucks? :)

  8. 8-26
    12:19
    pm

    My farm story is very much like yours. I bought a small farm never thinking about not having a truck, I had a station wagon. I went to the sale barn and bought 4 bottle calves and brought them home in the back of the station wagon. I went to a neighbors and bought as much hay as I could fit into the station wagon and those calves all did great. A few times they ended up in the kitchen for doctoring. Those first few years were a fun learning experience.

    I now have an old truck. :sheepjump:

  9. 8-26
    1:42
    pm

    you haul :turtle:

  10. 8-26
    2:54
    pm

    Good for you! How much more do you need? It has been a difficult hay year here too because of all the rain…..at least there was and is a lot of hay to be had.

  11. 8-26
    3:22
    pm

    We’ve had oodles of rain here too in Tennessee. The humidity is horrendous. I’m assuming that what you have is a 4-wheel drive. I can see how it could be done as long as it’ done right. Still, I applaud both of you. :) It’s exhausting work.

  12. 8-26
    7:05
    pm

    OMG! You sure got your exercise for the day! Is there a U-Haul near you where you could rent a trailer or something?

  13. 8-27
    10:55
    am

    Have you check on getting hay delivered? Here I can get a squeeze of 74 to 82 bales delivered for 50 dollar. It so worth it to not have to load it and make the trips back and forth.

  14. 8-29
    12:57
    am

    I agree with the hay delivery. If your hay guy can deliver for an additional small fee, go for it. Otherwise, you might want to lease a flatbed trailer. It’s MUCH easier to load and off load and you won’t have hay stubble buried in all corners of your SUV. AND… IRS loves farm deductions such as hay purchase and trailer rentals. (Ask me how I know !!)
    Of course, best course of action would be to have some big round bales handy and haul them out to your ‘herd’ as needed. Requires someone with a tractor and hay fork but it beats stacking hay in the barn all year.

  15. 8-29
    7:16
    am

    Wait till you try to clean the hay out of your truck, You’ll be finding hay 6 months from now!!!

  16. 9-4
    2:16
    pm

    Go girls. I live on a horse farm in Kentucky. We raise and train Quarter Horses. Our men all work full time somewhere besides the farm. It often leaves us girls to take care of everything here. But when you leave a bunch of women in charge things get done. You go girls!!

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