From My Nut-Stained Fingers


My name is Suzanne and I don’t like to sign books.

Maybe I should explain why I have this problem. Wait. I can’t. I don’t know why, really. Maybe because I’m shy. Maybe because I have terrible handwriting. Possibly it’s just a mental problem. Maybe because I’ve done many booksignings in my romance writer past which mostly involved directing people to the store restroom. I learned that the first thing one should do upon arriving at a bookstore for a booksigning is to determine the location of the bathroom because that is the most common reason people stop by your table.

Whatever the reason, I have a weird almost phobia about signing books, though I WILL DO IT. Unless you’re close to me personally, then good luck. Because if you’re close to me, I expect you to understand my phobia. I gave a copy of my book to a friend and he asked me to sign it, which I still haven’t done. I gave a copy of my book to Morgan and she asked me to sign it, which I still haven’t done. A friend had supper at our house recently.

Friend: “She won’t sign my book.”

Morgan: “She told me to sign her name myself!”

Me: “You should have my signature down by now.”

Okay, now that none of us really understand my problem, let’s get to the solution. For you. I think there’s no solution for me.

So many people have asked me about autographed books already. I do have a couple of booksignings coming up if you are in the local area.

I’m doing a booksigning today, Thursday, October 17, at Taylor Books in Charleston, from 6:00 to 7:30–please come see me! Today is also Charleston’s ArtWalk, 5:30 to 7:30–so come get a signed copy of my book and get free wine and snacks up and down the street. Also, I’ve been told that Taylor Books WILL allow people to bring in already-purchased books tonight for me to sign, so come on!

Saturday, October 26, starting at noon, I’ll be signing at the Books-a-Million in Charleston (Southridge/Corridor G)–and I’m planning to bring Maia with me! (She’ll be outside on the sidewalk with Morgan, greeting customers.)

If you can’t attend one of these booksignings–you can send the book to me (go ahead and read it first!) and I will send it back to you, signed. If you want to do this, email me at and I will give you the address to send. You can also do this if you’ve purchased copies of the book as gifts and I will sign it however you like and to whoever you like.

If you are in reasonable driving distance–in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, southern Ohio (within 3 hours distance), you can possibly talk me into coming out if you can arrange an appearance with a group, such as speaking for a community or civic organization or your local library. I’d be happy to do a speaking engagement and sign books. You can email me at

If you’re not within a reasonable driving distance–I’ve done a lot of speaking engagements in the past, all over the country, and even to Canada, I’ll go anywhere, but if you’re outside what I consider a reasonable driving distance (3 hours), your group would need to be able to provide travel (possibly airfare) and hotel. Again, email me at

I’d love to see you, or get a signed book to you, despite my mental problem, so there are several ways you can get a signed book from my nut-stained fingers. Because, yes, I have another problem at the moment. My fingers look like this:
Hulling walnuts is what one should do just before a booksigning, right? I like to think it makes me look like an authentic West Virginia farm girl. Right? RIGHT?


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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on October 17, 2013  

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12 Responses | RSS feed for comments on this post

  1. 10-17

    “Hulling walnuts is what one should do just before a booksigning, right? I like to think it makes me look like an authentic West Virginia farm girl. Right? RIGHT?”

    Absolutely! I would not expect anything less…. if they didn’t look like someone who works a farm, I would be suspect of their story.

  2. 10-17

    Suzanne: I LOVED your book. Finished it in three days, but I didn’t want it to end. I hope there will be another as you have had so many adventures since moving to Sassafras Farm.

  3. 10-17

    My “GIFT” arrived yesterday in the mail and I finished it at 2:14a.m. I could not put it down, something about reading an interesting book, you just don’t want to STOP reading. Your life is full of excitement and down right “NATURAL” happenings. There is nothing about sugar-coating or leaving anything untold in your book. The sad thing about your book is that it came to an end and now I want MORE. I know that there will be more as daily life-style and WORK for you makes for good reading for all of us highly addicted common natured folks. It truly was worth the tolerated wait. GREAT JOB!!! :moo:

  4. 10-17

    My book arrived yesterday afternoon. I refuse to pick it up until I finish canning the multiple 5 gallon buckets of apples that are sitting on my side porch. So, hopefully I will be able to start reading this weekend. Have you considered a Morgantown booksigning? Thought since Weston is there, you could combine a visit to him with a signing. We are only about an hour away.

  5. 10-17

    I am so over the top excited; my copy of the book arrived in the mail yesterday!!!I am loving it! I just recently learned about you and your farm and I must say I feel a real connection. I too packed myself up and moved myself to my dream. My dream has always been to live on a farm so I bought a falling down house and barn and built them back up. I don’t have any animals yet because in order to fund this dream I need to drive a very long distance for work daily. Until then I will live vicariously through your blog, and I look forward to taking some of your classes.

  6. 10-17

    Have you considered signing book plates – a sticker to put in the book – rather than shipping the book itself back and forth? I’d gladly send a SASE for one. If I can ever get to the post office to pick up my book, I’ll read it and send it in, if that’s the option, though. You’re probably not going to come to Maine for a signing, which is too bad. I’d buy you a lobster! Sorry to contribute to your writers’ cramp… :)

  7. 10-17

    The request for a signed copy is in a sense a vote of confidence that the book owner’s great grandchildren will be able to sell it on zBay (sic) for $1,000,000 Universal Credit Units in 2080. It’s a compliment! Why else have it signed?

    Sadly, I’ve more than once picked up an interesting book at a tag sale and found that it was signed by the author — and is now being shagged out the door for a few pennies.

    Sic transit gloria auctor — Julie Caesar, 43BC (before chickens)

  8. 10-17

    I hulled walnuts last weekend. I however wore gloves. :airkiss:

  9. 10-17

    Come to Kenya! We have bookstores!

  10. 10-17

    Yup, Suzanne…it keeps you real!

  11. 10-20

    I was so disappointed when I slid my finger across my iPad screen and realized I had reached the end of the book! :cry: I am ready for the next one. Thanks, I enjoyed it very much!

  12. 10-20

    I love your book, I have been reading it in the evening when I retreat to the quiet of my sitting room. It brought back memories that I had not thought of for years, and happily so. To read your story of StringTown Risisng is amazing, if anyone has not purchased the book, it is a must read so see how strong a woman really can be, and what it takes to make the dreams that you have in life come ture and the toll it can take on a person before you realize that dream, but in the end, drive and determination can make it happen happen. I know many of us that have followed you from the time you started the farm though what a “dream” life you were living, but behind the scenes is a story all it’s own, thank you for sharing it with us, that is not always an easy thing to do.

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