Crack Flowers

May
17


Yellow Crack Flowers: Genus Mysteriosa, a perennial flower found growing in cement cracks.

In my latest “Name That Flower!” here is a very pretty yellow flower that is blooming from the cracks in the steps in front of the cellar. They started blooming yesterday.

There’s another huge batch of them growing in a proper location in the garden on the other side of the studio.

It’s the same plant, but there isn’t as much light on this side of the studio, so these aren’t blooming yet.

I call them yellow crack flowers, but I’m sure you have another name for them. Tell me about it!





Comments

  1. Old Geezer says:

    If, instead, you call them “crevice flowers” you will be less likely to get a visit from the local blue.

  2. daria says:

    Looks like Evening Primrose (oenothera biennis). Pretty!

  3. wormlady says:

    Oenothera — many common names, although we debated the appropriateness of buttercups at the garden club sale a couple weeks ago. I’ve always used evening primrose, despite the fact that they are open all day.
    As you can tell by your quantity, they can be invasive, but I don’t mind pulling volunteers of whose location I disapprove.

  4. heidiannie says:

    What you have is a sundrop, relative to the Evening Primrose, although the sundrop closes its flowers in the evening. They can be very invasive.

  5. bbkrehmeyer says:

    I believe your plants are wild primrose. they spread nicely and can be grown from seed.

  6. CATRAY44 says:

    They are Missouri (or Ozark) Sundrops… evening primrose! I love them!

    http://www.denverplants.com/perennials/html/oenot_cam.htm

  7. jinx says:

    :fairy: I’ve led a sheltered life…i’ve only ever seen evening primrose in pink…….&^%$((@#$ I MUST get out more! LOL! Lovely flowers……When you do transplant those hosta keep in mind that they like a little shade. 🙂

  8. robinsnest1950 says:

    I’m guessing they are 4 O’clocks, or Marvel of Peru!

  9. Joell says:

    :butterfly:
    I have these flower as well, they were given to me by my Mohers, and I never did know what they were called, mine only bloom once in the season. I love yellow flowers and these make a nice show.

  10. stacylee says:

    I vote for buttercups, because I like the way it sounds. My mother in law gave me some a few years back and that’s what she called them.

  11. rhubarbrose says:

    We call them 4 o’clocks here. I love them because they are a perennial that blooms most of the summer. I like your “crack flowers” name too 🙂

  12. Flowerpower says:

    I have the pink ones but the yellow is pretty. Nothing is invasive in my yard. Its just lucky to be alive there. Too many things under the ground and above the ground that seem to want to unearth just about anything that I have growing. Your garden is pretty and everything will be a surprise. How fun! :happyflower:

  13. Dorette says:

    I think they are called Missouri Primrose – they spread like weeds!!!

  14. rurification says:

    They are primroses [oenothera]. They spread like crazy and will even take over weeds. I love them.

  15. cherylinwv says:

    I’m going with the Buttercup group and the daggone things spread like wild fire!

  16. leneskate says:

    Pretty but not in the crack of the steps, sounds like you can move them. They sound very hardy :happyflower: :butterfly:

  17. shesornery says:

    I say buttercups. The leaves and stems look like my buttercups. They are very profuse and have a great fragrance. To my knowledge, primroses are shorter, but I don’t know all of the families of primroses.

  18. Pete says:

    Yep. They are Oenothera. Mine don’t spread much at all because they are in part shade. Keep meaning to translpant them, but it never seems to happen.

  19. VictorianGirl says:

    To me they look like primroses we used to have in the yard.

  20. VaGirl2 says:

    My neighborhood gardenng expert calls them Missouri Primrose. She shared some with me and they do spread nicely. They are very similar to evening primrose, but not the same. 🙂

  21. KarenAnne says:

    Definitely Missouri Evening Primrose.

Add Your Thoughts