Bye, Babies

Oct
2


Peanut and Coal start their new lives today as studs on a new farm. I’m so happy they went together, and I know they will be spoiled.

It’s always sad to see babies go, but there are only two reasons to regularly breed animals (not counting if you’re trying to increase your own herd). One is to butcher (or sell for butchering), and the other is to sell to become the darlings of someone else’s farm. The second is a more celebratory occasion, so I can’t complain!


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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on October 2, 2011  

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Comments

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  1. 10-2
    1:38
    pm

    See. I could have stolen them when I was there painting and they never would have found me way over here. :) They are so adorable it made me want a goat!

  2. 10-2
    1:41
    pm

    That second pic just makes me want to “wuffle” that little face! So cute, and glad they have great new homes to go to!

  3. 10-2
    1:45
    pm

    they are so adorable, can you sent one to me :), i wish them all the love and happiness they need in their new houses :heart:

  4. 10-2
    2:18
    pm

    I’m so glad that I got to hold both of them at the party! I know they will be happy being stud-puppies!

    Joann

  5. 10-2
    4:04
    pm

    The other compelling reason to breed is if you want a milk supply. Often one can skip a year and “milk through” but generally it takes babies to make milk.

    So glad your babies are off to a good home!

  6. 10-2
    4:43
    pm

    Are those baby goats actually CUDDLING?!?! Between that and the dangles, I just might faint from cuteness…..

  7. 10-2
    5:54
    pm

    Yay Teresa! I’m so happy for you! I know you will be a great momma! :heart: :snoopy: :hug:

  8. 10-2
    7:04
    pm

    They look happy with their new people.

  9. 10-2
    7:09
    pm

    Shelley, yes, for goats, milking is usually a by-product of #2, as it’s not as common to butcher dairy goats. (With cows, milking is often a by-product of #1!)

  10. 10-2
    8:11
    pm

    Suzanne, Actually I think that number 2 is a by-product of really wanting milk! It is often stressful to find good homes for the babies every year but it is something that is necessary and very rewarding when you succeed.

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