The Downside of Spring

Apr
2

IMG_1843
Well, if you can call it that…. Sometimes I don’t mind. But it IS a problem at times! With the beautiful weather, I like to open my front door to the screen door, which has a “cat door” (broken screen section). Maia likes to use it to come in and visit.


Which isn’t terrible until she scampers onto the dining room table.

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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on April 2, 2014  

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Comments

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  1. 4-2
    11:33
    am

    That is too funny! :lol:

  2. 4-2
    11:36
    am

    He-he!

  3. 4-2
    12:22
    pm

    Gee, and to think I worry about letting the flies in if I leave the door open…

  4. 4-2
    12:44
    pm

    :happyflower:
    My only concern with an open section in the door would not be for Maia entering but other chritters that live in the country. We took our bird feeder down last week because with in a 10 day period we had a raccoon, possum and a skunk visit the feeder–it is the first time that I have seen a skunk that wasnt squished. Our neighbors have a doggie door, she cake home from work a couple weeks ago and found 2 raccoons in her kitchen! :bugeyed:

  5. 4-2
    5:30
    pm

    Our first cat, Borg (may he R.I.P.) once came SCREAMING in through his cat door on a summer night. Then he crouched at the top of the landing and stared out the cat door for likely 1/2 hour. I got up and followed his gaze. It was a raccoon that had scared him, and was now thinking about coming in. He was too big (thankfully) to fit.

    Just this past winter, on one 2AM night during a series of snow, cold rain, freeze, snow, etc. events, I heard a banging on my garage door. I went down to look, and at the base of the garage door, next to the garbage cans, was a small ‘coon trying to get in. I kicked the door from the back, trying to scare him away.

    No scare. In fact, he started to CRY at me.

    Now the weather had been so bad for a few days stretch that he was probably starving. But, since he didn’t scare, my first thought was “rabid?”

    It was, in fact, hard to walk away from a crying, possibly baby animal in distress, but rabies is one thing I won’t weaken on.

    In the morning he was gone, and so was about a foot of the garage door weather strip. He never got in.

    By the way, I live on the border between suburban and hobby farm and small farm territory.

    NEW SUBJECT: I’m in Kingsland, GA visiting my ailing older brother. Today I went to the Submarine Museum in Saint Marys, GA. It’s not a great big fancy thing (like, for example, New London, CT) but it’s got a lot of nice personal artifacts. So, if you’re in the area (i.e. Jacksonville, FL area), and following the exploits of a certain sailor named “Ross” person, you might want to stop in and see the view through a real periscope (WWII variety).

    So, anyway, beware of friendly/hard-to-scare wild animals when rabies are known to be in the area. DO NOT APPROACH THEM. Instead, call animal control. No, I did not do that at the 2AM thing. They would have shown up at 9AM and not found anything. Let’s be real here.

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The Slanted Little House

"It was a cold wintry day when I brought my children to live in rural West Virginia. The farmhouse was one hundred years old, there was already snow on the ground, and the heat was sparse-—as was the insulation. The floors weren’t even, either. My then-twelve-year-old son walked in the door and said, “You’ve brought us to this slanted little house to die." Keep reading our story....






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