Register    Reset Password

Echinacea Tincture

Submitted by: sharon on October 26, 2012
0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5
Loading...
Echinacea Tincture

A tincture made of echinacea (commonly known as purple coneflower) is often used in herbal medicines. Echinacea is popularly believed to be an immunostimulator, stimulating the body’s immune system and warding off infections. It’s great to have on hand for cold and flu season. Time to put …

Difficulty:

Ingredients

Directions

A tincture made of echinacea (commonly known as purple coneflower) is often used in herbal medicines. Echinacea is popularly believed to be an immunostimulator, stimulating the body’s immune system and warding off infections. It’s great to have on hand for cold and flu season. Time to put some up for a rainy (sneezy) day!


ech

How to make Echinacea Tincture:
Echinacea root (purple coneflower root)
100 proof vodka (I used 151 proof Everclear)
Cheese cloth
Glass Jar

ech2

Take root and cover with vodka. Sit in a cool dark place and shake DAILY for SIX weeks.

ech3

After six weeks strain through cheese cloth.

ech4

ech5

Squeeze all of the liquid out of the cheese cloth and discard the used echinacea root.

ech6

Bottle in sterilized jars/containers.

ech7

Now you’re ready for the cold and flu season! If you don’t drink alcohol, just put a couple of teaspoons into a cup of hot tea and the alcohol will evaporate.

Get the handy printable and save this to your recipe box: How to make Echinacea Tincture


Do you have a recipe post or kitchen-related story to share on the Farm Bell blog?
See Farm Bell Blog Submissions for information, the latest blog contributor giveaway, and to submit a post.

Want to subscribe to the Farm Bell blog? Go here.

What can you enter to win this month? Click here.

Categories: Blog

Did you make this recipe? Share your photo here:

Make sure the page has finished loading before you upload a photo.

Max photo size is 512KB. The best size to upload is 500 x 375 pixels.

By uploading a photo, you attest that this photo belongs to you. If you are uploading a photo that does not belong to you, please provide documentation that you have permission to use the photo to FBRblog(at)yahoo.com or the photo will not be approved.


Other recipes you may enjoy:





Comments

13 comments | RSS feed for comments of this post

  1. 10-26
    10:38
    am

    How much Echinacea did you use?

  2. 10-26
    2:02
    pm

    Thanks for sharing this!

  3. 10-26
    2:22
    pm

    Hi Tori, This was a large batch that I made to last the entire winter for a household of four.
    I used a pound of root and almost that entire bottle of Everclear.
    You can make the batch any size you want, just be sure to cover the root with the Vodka or Everclear.

  4. 10-26
    5:29
    pm

    How much of this do you use per dose per age/weight? 1 Tsp, 1 Tbs? How to you administer it? How often? And how long can you take it before needing to go off of it so that it remains effective in your system?

    Thanks!

  5. 10-26
    11:28
    pm

    here is how I make mine
    also a little trick I learned a few years ago when you go to extract the plant matter use a French Press makes it fast and easy :))
    Fight Infections with Three Powerful Herbs

    by Susun S. Weed
    Author and voice of the Wise Woman Way

    Wise women through the centuries have kept themselves and their families safe from contagious diseases. We looked at the lung strengthening properties of mullein and whole milk in part one of this article. In this part, we will learn how to use herbs to fight infections.

    If we are actively dealing with infection, especially lung infections, these three powerful roots stand ready to help us: elecampane, echinacea, and poke.

    Elecampane (Inula helenium) is a beautiful sunflower-like perennial found in wet pastures or easily cultivated in a sunny garden spot. The roots are dug in the fall after the plants are established (at least three years) and tinctured in 100 proof vodka for six weeks. Do not use elecampane in capsules.

    I find elecampane root amazingly powerful in clearing all infections from the lungs. The usual dose is 10-15 drops several times a day, but I would increase the dose and take it as much as 6 times a day in an acute situation. I expect to see results from using elecampane within a day or less.

    I would only take elecampane if I had an active infection. It has little protective value. To protect the lungs, use mullein and organic whole milk.

    Echinacea (Echinacea augustifolia) is a well-known anti-infective. Like elecampane, it is not considered safe to take echinacea as a preventative. It is reserved for time when there is active infection.

    Echinacea root tincture is a powerful ally to the white blood cells, helping them enormously in their efforts to counter bacterial infections. I have personally seen it clear infections that even triple antibiotic therapies had left untouched, including bacterial pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections, strep throat, mastitis, and blood poisoning. I have had no occasion to work with someone with SARS, but I have no doubt but that echinacea would be helpful. I have interfaced echinacea with antibacterial drugs and antibiotics with excellent results. Echinacea also works marvelously well in combination with elecampane root or with poke root. I have never used the three of them together.

    A dose of echinacea root tincture is 1 drop for every 2 pounds of body weight. I take it as frequently as every hour or two in the acute phase of an infection, and increase the time between doses slowly until they are eight hours apart.

    Because I use such a large dose of echinacea root tincture, I get spectacular results. But to be able to use so much, you need to have a lot of the tincture on hand. It is expensive to buy, running $8-10 per ounce. Large bottles of 4-8 ounces bring the price down to $6-8 an ounce. But you can make your own for $1-2 dollars an ounce.

    To make a quart of echinacea root tincture:

    1. Buy 4 ounces of dried Echinacea augustifolia root. Be sure to get this kind.

    2. Put it in a quart jar and fill the jar to the top with 100 proof vodka. Be sure to get this proof even though it is more expensive than regular vodka.

    3. Cap tightly and label.

    4. Shake daily for the first week, then weekly for at least eight weeks. I like to let mine sit for a year before I use it, but you can use it after six weeks if necessary.

    as for dose I use echinacea for infection most often is 1 drop for every 2 pounds of body weight. taken as frequently as every hour or two in the acute phase of an infection, and then I increase the time between doses slowly until they are eight hours apart.

  6. 10-26
    11:31
    pm

    haha as you see I study Susan Weed and I only meant to give you the info on the Enhinacea sorry for the other stuff

  7. 10-27
    4:23
    am

    THANK YOU!!!

    A couple of weeks ago, I had a friend teach an herbal class in our Relief Society meeting (women’s meeting at church). She made and brought in for each of us, a sample of Comfrey/Goldenseal salve. I’ve been using it on a spot on my face that had grown to about a fingertip in length. It’s disappearing. (Dermatologist looked at it years ago and said it was nothing serious.)It’s now only about the size of my pinky nail. Also, the wart that came up a couple of months ago on the side of a finger and under the nail has died and came off yesterday. And I’ve had no side effects – no damage to surrounding tissue, bleeding, etc. Great stuff, herbs!

  8. 10-27
    9:57
    am

    Hi Darlene, Hubby was getting sick and I gave him 1 ounce mixed with 4 ounces of Pineapple juice. When I take it – I mix about an ounce in a cup of hot tea –I just take until I;m feeling like myself again- usually only a couple of days. I don’t know if I’d give it to kids — for me, I’d have to really do more research before I gave it to children.

    You are right, herbs are great stuff! I’ve been making my own salves and tinctures for awhile now.
    I also make my own deodorant, tooth powder, shampoo bars, ect. I’m really trying to get away from the commercial chemicals and I’ve got to tell you, I’m loving the shampoo bars, my hair has never looked healthier!

  9. 10-27
    11:35
    am

    I use Echinacea Tincture on my children if you so not like the idea of giving them in base you can also make it in vegetable glycerin it is made the same way 🙂 I feel it is such a small amount I don’t worry about it

  10. 10-27
    4:47
    pm

    I’ve been “No-poo” for about 3 years now. Just baking soda to wash my thigh-length hair and ACV to rinse it.

    I also use 92% alcohol for deodorant for the last 2 or so years. I just put it into a small spray bottle that I got from Wallyworld for $1.

    I haven’t made soap in a couple of years but I need to make some more. I have all the ingredients, it’s just a “round tuit” thing.

    Thanks for the advice!

  11. 10-28
    6:42
    am

    I am wondering where you are able to find your alcohol for making tinctures. I can only find 80 proof and am interested in making other tinctures, but prefer at least 100 proof.

  12. 10-29
    10:30
    am

    I am so inspired by all of you, I have never made anything like this and would love to learn. Where do I find the things like the roots to start making my salves and tinctures. or..how to do my soaps & shampoos. My Great Grandmother used to make her own lye soap & I thought that was awesome, she had the most beautiful complexion & the cleanest clothes. I’m open to any help to get back to nature.

  13. 10-29
    12:29
    pm

    here is my fav place to buy herbs http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/

Leave a Comment

You must be registered to post a review or comment.

Already registered? Use the login form at the top of the page.

Search Farm Bell Recipes

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
All Recipes
Appetizers & Snacks
Bagels
Bean Soups
Beans
Beans, Grains & Rice
Beef
Beverages
Biscuits
Blog
Boiling Water Bath
Bread Machine
Breads
Breakfast
Brownies
Budget
BWB Condiments
BWB Fruits
BWB Jams, Jellies, Butters & Preserves
BWB Marmalades & Conserves
BWB Other
BWB Pickles & Pickled Stuff
BWB Salsas
BWB Sauces
BWB Tomatoes & Combos
BWB Vegetables
Cakes
Candy
Canning
Casserole
Casserole
Casserole
Cereals
Cheese
Cheesecakes
Chilis
Chowders
Cobblers
Coffee Cake
Cold Remedies
Condiments
Cookery 101
Cookies & Bars
Cream Soups
Crisps
Crock Pot
Crowd-Size
Crusts
Cupcakes
Cure & Smoke
Dairy
Dehydrating
Desserts
Diabetic
Dips
Doughnuts
Dressings
Egg Dishes
Eggs
Entertaining
Fat-Free
Featured
Fermenting
Fillings
Fish
Food Photography
Freezing
Frostings & Icings
Frozen
Fruit Breads
Fruit Cakes
Fruit Salads
Fruits
Gift Basket Goodies
Giveaways
Gluten-Free
Goat Cheeses
Gourmet
Gravies
Griddles
Grill-Outdoor Cooking
Hard Cheeses
Herbs & Spices
Holiday
Homemade Cheese
How To
Ice Creams
Ingredients
Ingredients & Mixes
Jell-O
Jell-O Salads
Kid-Friendly
Kitchen Gadgets
Kosher
Lactose-Free
Lamb
Leftovers
Lettuce & Greens
Low-Carb
Low-Fat
Low-Sodium
Main Dish
Marinades
Meat Salads
Meet the Cook
Muffins
Non-Dairy
Old-Fashioned
One Dish Meal
Other Breads
Other Breakfast
Other Condiments
Other Dairy
Other Desserts
Other Main Dish
Other Salads
Other Side Dishes
Other Soups & Stews
Other Special Diets
Pasta
Pasta
Pasta Salads
Pastries
PC Beef
PC Chicken
PC Meats
PC Other
PC Poultry
PC Soups & Stews
PC Veggies
Pets
Pickling
Pies
Pizza
Pizza Crusts
Pork
Potato Salads
Potatoes
Potluck
Poultry
Presentation
Preserving
Pressure Canning
Pressure Cooker
Puddings & Custards
Recipe Requests
Relishes & Chutneys
Rolls
Rubs
Salads
Salads
Salsas
Sandwiches
Sauces
Scones
Seafood
Side Dishes
Soft Cheeses
Soups & Stews
Sourdough
Special Diets
Special Occasions
Steam Juicer
Stocks
Stuffings
Substitutions
Syrups
Tarts
Tips & Tricks
Tortillas & Pitas
Using FBR
Vegan
Vegetable Breads
Vegetable Salads
Vegetables
Vegetarian
Wild Game
Yeast Breads








If you would like to help support the overhead costs of this website, you may donate. Thank you!


We Want to Meet You


Farm Bell Recipes is all about you! If you're a member of our community and have been submitting recipes and/or blog posts to Farm Bell Recipes, we want to meet you!
Go to Meet the Cook and submit the form to be featured.


Canning Tutorials

Recent Reviews and Comments




Latest on the Forum

The Farmhouse Table

The Canning Pot

Sign up for the
Chickens in the Road Newsletter




Thanks for being part of our community!