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Stories of the Past
August 10, 2010
2:32 pm
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Grandmatotwochicks
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My Grandmother was born in 1904 Gladys Inez Claybrook, she writes that they all meaning her Mom and siblings told her that she was laid on a tree stump by a crow, she writes under her baby picture ( Do I look like that ?)  Gladys was born in Cook County Texas, this was prarie country one half mile from the Red River.  It was a farming community, each farm had about two hundred and fifty acres, approximately one half was used for cultivation and the other half was used for stock grazing.  We had cows, horses, mules ect.  Houses were far apart, so there was very little social life.  We had a old time country store, it was built in 1882.  We had a black smith shop, and a cotton jin.  The Country Doctor had is office beside the store, he owned the store.

Our school was a two room white building very small with a pot bellied stove for heat and a out side toilet.  Our water was hauled in by wagon in barrels.  The yard around the school was fenced in by barb wire.  In the spring the yard around the school and the pasture was filled with the color of wild daisies, I can still feel the joy of that experience every spring.  A note on the Red River this river could be dry placid or very angry, it always ran red and muddy.  I have seen it in the flood stage one mile wide with houses and cattle ect.  floating down.  It heads some where in N.M. and gets to be a very large river where it empties out into the Mississippi.

My Grandmother's last name was Stewart.  I never knew her first name, she and my Grandfather lived with my Great Grandparents in Illinois.  My Great Grand Father owned and operated a Hide Tannery, my Grand parents had five children of which one of them was my mother Pirly born 1865 in Ill.  My mothers parents decided to leave Illinois and come to Texas by wagaon train.  The morning they left my Grandfather mounted his horse and announced that he was leaving his family riding in the other direction to the Black Hill's of So. Dakota, they never saw him again. 

 

The computer is acting up so this is all for today, sorry about the grammar and spelling, a writer I am not.yes

August 10, 2010
4:38 pm
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JeannieB
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Thanks fo much for sharing!!  Her book is a wonderful legacy for you and your family.

Don't cry because it's over—smile because it happened!

August 10, 2010
4:48 pm
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BuckeyeGirl
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Yes thank you!  I'm going to try not to comment too much so we don't break up the flow too much, but be assured that I'll be watching for any new installments!  yes

Located in N.E. Ohio

August 11, 2010
2:58 am
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Grandmatotwochicks
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Part Two

My mother was eight years old at the time and had one younger brother and a sister and two older brothers five children in all.  My Grandmother decided to face the trip alone with the children.  They had some cattle they drove through, food was very scarce and they feared Indian attacks all the way to Texas.  I never knew how long it took them to make the trip.  They ended up on the Brapos River north of mid Texas and stayed there about three years before they migrated to Cook County where the farm I know about was built.  My Grandmother bought the land and the boys built the house where I was born.

My Mother was married to a man in the early 1880's to a man named Jesse Vance they had two girls Maud and Jessie.  The Oklahoma territory opened up and my Mother and her husband and Uncle Charlie and the two little girls decided to make a run for the land grab.  They would get a section thats 380 acres, it had to be developed and a house had to be built on it, you had to live on it for so many years before they got the title, in the mean time they had another child Luther my half brother.  They had only been in Oklahoma a few years when my Mothers husband and Uncle Charlie died.  The men had been burning brush and a blizzard came upon them very suddenly and froze the clothes on their backs, they died four days later of pneumonia.

Mother packed up a few things and took the cattle back to Cook county.  My Grandmother would not let my mother stay with her, so a few neighbors heard about it and how she was being treated and found her a house and food and a place to put the stock, somehow she made it.  I am not sure how many years passed before she made peace with her Mother.  When my Grandmother passed away my mother inherited the farm and land.  In 1900 my Mother met my Father William Marion, he was born in England and was six feet four with black hair and a handle bar mustache.  I remember him as having a violent temper and used it most of the time.  He and my Mother had three more children of which I am the middle one.  My Father died when I was five years old, he came upon his end by a dispute over weight in a cotton field and was shot by a man, this was about one hundred miles from us in East Texas.

This left my Mother and us three kids to sink or swim, we raised cotton, corn, wheat, some years it was good and some years it was not.  The weather was a big factor as we lived in the cyclone belt.  Our water well was up about 1/4 mile in our field and we hauled it to the house with a sled that held four oak barrels and drawn by horse.  We drew our water in a large bucket hand over hand it was very hard work.  In the winter we froze and in summer we burned.  Our bathroom was a  chic sales up in the peach orchard, needless to say we diden't always make it there especially in the cold of winter.

The day I started to school for the first time, I shall never forget, I left home at sun up, I was six years old and we lived two miles from the school.  I think I ran all the way do to the fact that I had to cross creeks and go through pastures of cattle.  The only thing Mama said to me before I left was look out for the bull's they will attack you, so I went to school scared to death everyday.  I always knew there were things we did not have but our neighbors did not have them either so I did not realize we were so poor until I got much older.  We had food we raised, fruit we canned and raised our own meat.  Our ham's were all salt cured and smoked in a house built for that purpose.  We used oak chips in a iron container to get the smoke.  Our sausage and chops was fried until done and packed in five gallon crocks of lard.  Now it makes me sick to think of it.  We never had ice as we lived twenty miles from the nearest town.  I have very fond memories of a large pecan tree, we had up in back of the hog pasture.  Holly my younger brother and I used to play on that old tree, it was like a good friend.

In the fall of the year there was a lot of cattle movement by our farm.  The men would come to our house and demand us kids to stand in the lanes with only a stick to keep the cows on the main road, they never gave us a penny for our help, I really think Mama was afraid of them.  It was very dangerous and she never told them no.  We had cyclones hail and deep snows.  We also spent a lot of time in our storm cellar in the spring and summer.

We lived under the fly path for ducks and geese and they often stopped for water at our water pond out in the pasture, sometimes we were able to kill one, and that was quite a treat on our table.  They flew at night in the full moon.  We also hunted rabbits in the snow, our days would start at day light and end at dark.  We had cows to milk, horses and chickens to feed and eggs to gather, hogs to slop.

I had never seen a car and in 1910 our Doctor Greaves bought a Model T Ford touring car and I got to ride in it, eventually I think all the school kids got the same treat  I am sure it was only going about ten miles an hour but it took my breath away.  The only real harm it did was scare all of the horses.  My Mother and all the other older people said they would never ride in one of those ( Gas Buggies).

This is my Granny's life when she was a child, it is very hard to read, so I am not sure of the spelling for Brapos River.  Hope you enjoy the story!  I do have pictures but I have no way of loading them on to the computer.happy-flower

August 11, 2010
9:32 am
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BuckeyeGirl
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You have such a treasure G'maTo2!!!  I think I'd call the local library, or take it (carefully!) and see if they can help you preserve, record, scan etc so there's an electronic record on a CD, or suggest someone to help you. (if I lived anywhere near I'd be there NOW helping you!)  Is there a historical society there?  When (if) you get an electronic record, you can see if a Texas historical society in Cook County TX is interested in a copy too if you wanted to that is. 

Your spelling or your Grandmother's spelling or wording is so NOT a problem, it's part of the experience. THANK YOU!!!

Located in N.E. Ohio

August 11, 2010
12:17 pm
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CATRAY44
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I am loving this!  Thank you, so much, for sharing her story with us!

August 11, 2010
12:26 pm
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Flatlander
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keep it  coming ;-) I love it.

August 11, 2010
12:55 pm
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Thank you for all of your support! it seems that the OLD computer works better at night, so I will post more in the evening.  I was doing a little research on the computer and children were often taken by Comanche's in the 1800's so it was a real threat for my Granny's Mother when they took the wagon train out from Ill.  In the research is states that the children often had a better life with the Indians, they spent more time with their children, took them in as their own, were allowed to play and were taught many things.  The farm work on the other hand was brutal on a child, and there was not time for children to just be kids.  Just thought that was interesting.  I will keep the story coming, this is just as much fun for me, as it is for you all to read.happy-flower

August 11, 2010
5:02 pm
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GammaClemons
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The Brazos River (I am sure that's what your Granny was referring to vs. Brapos River) starts in New Mexico and ends at the Gulf of Mexico.  It is the longest river in the State of Texas and the 11th longest in the US.  Cook County is probably actually Cooke County.  But the counties may have moved around from those days though.  Brazos River actually is more West of Cooke County so I think your Granny probably lived somewhere in the Weatherford, Texas area back then.  However, Cooke County is closer to the Oklahoma/Texas border area, so maybe she was referring to the Red River – it's all very confusing huh?!  Love to hear old stories like this.  My Great Grandma on my Dad's side of the family was interviewed by the Dallas Morning Newspaper for her 100th birthday and they documented her life story on cassette.  I still have them and it is all so very interesting to hear about the old west and stuff.  Keep it going please!

August 11, 2010
5:47 pm
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CindyP
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It's wonderful reading this….a very old time brought to life.  Thank you!  Can't wait for the next exerpt!

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

August 11, 2010
8:41 pm
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Part 3 of Granny's story

Our only encounter with the outside world, was our trips to Gainesville twenty miles away.  Our trips are well rembered in winter Mama never thought to bring a quilt and in summer she never took an umbrella or water.  So we froze or burnt up.  On the way to town we had zero food to eat but she would buy cheese and crackers for the ride home but no water.  The trip took two day's one down one back.  One of these trips she took us to see a Picture Show our first!  we were thrilled.  Mama always knew someone to spend the night with, but she would never take anything she raised on the farm to pay for their hospitality and even though I was very young I was so embarrassed.  I remember the town well, brick streets and the noises so different then in the country.  We left our horse and wagon in the livery stable it cost 25 cents, and we always took butter and eggs to sell, Mama never bought us candy.

One day my Mama took Holly and I to the very back of our pasture land where there was a grove of tree's and a little stream ran through, there we found wood violets growing, the eight of those lovely little faces thrill me untill this day when I think of them.  The one thing we were really scared of was Mountain Lions, we only heard talk of them, but it scared us kids enough that we never ventured out into the woods alone. (Granny write's that we call them Cayote's out here) in Texas they called them wolve's, they looked bigger and more bushy tailed.  They used to slink along in rows in our corn fields.  Our worst encounter with wild life was one rainy night Mama had gone to town and left Holly and I there alone, we had a new litter of pigs down in the old log barn and the old sow started to scream a big racket squealing, the dogs started running across the pasture and down to the barn.  That kept up for quite a while, Holly and I were scared to death, then it all calmed down, we never ventured out of the house until Mama got home the next day, I was about 10 and Holly was 7, when Mama found all the pigs gone boy did we get it!  I cannot figure out to this day how she sought to blame us young kids.

One day Holly and I were up in the field playing around the old well, Holly looked over the rim to far and started to dive head first into the well, the wind being just right when I screamed after I caught him by the feet, I don't know how long I had to hold on to him until my Mama came and lifted him out.  That well was lined with rocks, if I had let loose he woulden't be here today, he and I really had quite a few close calls.  I never saw a rattler snake and never even herd of them,  but we had copper heads, chicken snakes, black snakes and garen variety.  We had for many years a large black dog, he weighed about 90 pounds and had a white ring over one eye, we called him Ring, he was Holly and my shadow for many years.  We had a large flock of Pea Hens and a White Pea foul, that thing was so noisy when it was going to rain.  We had a black horse that was very curley coated and a span of small mules, but the horse was my favorite.

On a clear snowey night we could see the ( not sure what she means borolus)  but she is talking about the stars in the north, it was a site to see.  In the fall after our field work was finished we would spend about two weeks going to the bottom land near the river to cut wood for the winter.  The squirrels and birds were different then on the prarie land.  After the first frost we went to the river to gather pecans and wild persimmons, those days were like a holiday for us.  We gathered a large  sack full of pecans every year.  In the spring we went there also and gathered wild plums, they grew wild all along the river.  We made jelly out of these wild plums.  They grew on bushes instead of trees.  There was also a saw mill of sorts where we went to haul rough lumber for improvement for the out houses and barn etc.  I have to say something about my very dear friend named Miss Burness Capps, she was an elderly maiden lady and I was allowed to go visit her about once a month if weather permitted, they lived about a mile away and I had to go through the corn fields to get there, she always had cake and gave me bits of ribbons and lace.  Miss Capps always just talked to me and would always walk me back through the corn fields.  When we moved away my grief was leaving her.

To be continuedchicken

August 11, 2010
9:05 pm
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CATRAY44
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This is a real treasure.  Your grandma was a good writer.  I would buy this book.

August 12, 2010
5:06 pm
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Part 4 of Granny's story

We did not have company very often, and did not have anyone our age to play with.  There was one time I can't remember how it happened but the Preacher was invited to dinner at our house, my sister's Maude and Jessie, and Maude's husband were there.  When it was time to eat, us kids were sent out in the yard to play, they had fried chicken, I can still see and smell it to this day!, us kid's were very hungry and we were drooling, Holly was crying he was so hungry, so I snook ( Granny writes) into the house and took a piece of chicken out of the skillet for him, Mama caught me and I was called a thief,  Mama told me years later that she could never trust me because of that incident.

One day we went to town a little town across the Red River to North Oklahoma, when we crossed in the morning the river was rising but we was able to go forward into town.  But when we came back in late afternoon it was very high, the water was swirling and very angry, the ferry came for us and we got in the middle of the current and the cable broke, we started down the river and we were scared to death, we had always heard tales about quick sand, and I just knew we was going to be swallowed up.  The man with the long pole he had on board managed to get to the other side and stopped it by pulling it onto shore, his brother brought some mules and hooked them to the ferry and inched it back up to the slip where we could get off.  They got 25 cents for all of that.  Their names were the Langford Brothers. 

My Great Grand Parents was named Harmess, Great Grand Father was Scotch Irish and they said his wife was half Cherokee Indian, Mama never liked to talk about it, she said that they were very wealthy, he was in the Tanning business.  He kept his money in cow horns hung on the wall's of their house.  She said you diden't even look at them much less touch them.  I was fourteen when my life on the farm ended.  My life was hard but we had animals, freedom and learned about farming the hard way.  The things I diden't know about years later.  The people in this small community was the have not's, but everyone felt equal and that was a blessing in it's self.

Mr. Capp's the Father of Miss Burness was a cripple, he was cutting hay with a cycle its an implement you ride on as it is pulled by two horses.  It has a cutter called a cycle that extrudes to the right side of a two wheel vehicle cutters slip back and forth and cut's hay.  They ran over a bumble bee nest and the horses ran away and threw Mr. Capps into the cycle and cut off his leg's.  When I knew him he was in a wheel chair, he had a walking cane and would pull of kid's to him and kiss and hug us he was such a dear.

One year our well went dry and we went to Mr. Capps to do our washing, when it was dry, Holly and Mama and I were was taking the clothes down and Holly grabbed Mama's drawer's and ran and shook them at Mr. Capp's, Mr. Capp's laughed so hard he nearly fell out of his wheel chair.  Mama slapped Holly all the way home and for day's after she slapped him ever time she thought of it.  It was alot funnier to see then to read about.  My Mother's first marriage, she was married very young in the early 1880's to a man named Jesse Vance, she had three children by him, Maude, Jessie, Luther.  Maude was the oldest and she married a man by the name of Pless Russell they lived on a large farm about four miles from us.  They had a little boy named Aiden, I loved him very much.  Maude had a second child and Mama and Holly and I went over to their farm to take care of her, she was very ill and so was the baby.  The baby died and she just walked the floor with a very high fever.  They called it the walking fever, after sometime, Pless her husband moved her to Gainsville, but she was still in very bad health.  One day Pless and Aiden came out to our farm, it was a very hot day, Mama tried to get Pless to put the top on the buggy, but he would not and drove home in all that heat.  When he got home it was late, he un hitched the horse and went into the house to see if Maude was alright, then he went into the bedroom and took Aiden by the hand and went down to the barn, saying he was going to feed the horse.  The next thing Maude heard was two shots, she screamed and the neighbors came and found him and Aiden dead.  Maude remained in Gainsville for sometime after that, then she moved to a small health town named Minerals Wells and started a rooming house.

August 12, 2010
11:36 pm
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CATRAY44
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What a story.  How hard and sad her life could be and yet how hopeful and strong and brave your grandma was!

August 13, 2010
12:07 am
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Miss Judy
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There are so many stories out there about our grandparents we all need to write them down. Also we need to journal for our grandkids and ggrandkids. What I wouldn't give for my grandmothers  handwritten story! She told me so many stories now I am not so sure that all my remembrances are accurate.

August 14, 2010
12:49 am
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Part 5 of Granny's story

This is something I have thought about many times but the answers never add up, Mama always talked about how, poor they were when they arrived on the ( Brapos) river from Ill.  That they had nearly starved to death and how they lived off the land.  Hunting was very good in those days, I never knew how long they stayed there, but they moved more then a hundred miles north and aquired the two hundred and fifty acres that I was born on.  This land they fenced, dug a wel, l built a house and barn and all the out buildings along with a large orchard.

My question is where did the money come from? to pay for all of this? I can remember hush conversations between my Mama and sister Jessie about my Uncle Dell riding with the La Sell bros. of which Haney was the boss.  They were still active when we left the farm and went to Oklahoma  Jessie's husband said that Haney had killed his brother in a poker game, I remember when this happened.  I also heard talking about my Uncle Dell being chased by the law from Oklahoma  territory to Texas, the river divided the two states.  When Uncle Dell got in the middle of the river he was hit in the leg by a gun shot, he managed to stay on his horse and rode in home about one mile, Grandma managed to get him off of his horse and into the house.  All I know is after that he had what was called a peg leg.  They said he could ride as well as he did before.  Mama would never talk about how Dell and Jim died. 

This is a story I have never told anyone, but I am sure you will find it interesting, when we sold the farm in Texas, we went across the river to a small town in Oklahoma  We bought a small house on twenty acres of land boardering the edge of town, we stayed there for about four years and sold to the Askew family.  Mama got 7000.00 cash for the place, at the time there was a large land swindle going on in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  They some how got a hold of Mama and my older brother and sold them a package in So. Texas.  Everyone begged Mama not to go through with the deal.  The more they talked the more stuborn she got and the deal was made.  Mama sold everything we owned and bought a old Buick car and away we went to Texas.  When we arrived in Texas we found she had bought a package of nothing.  The prospective buyers were brought in by trains from all over the U.S.   Mama brooded over it for a week or so.  One day when all the trains were in Mama got her old shot gun and put us kids in the old car and drove there.

People were walking around everywhere.  The seller had little tables where they were doing selling and Mama walked up to him and with her shot gun leveled it on him and told him they were all thief's and she wanted her money back.  There was so many people in hearing distance of her it started a wispering campaign through out the trains.  We heard they diden't do much business on that trip.  So anyway the powers that be jumped up and surrounded her and begged her to back off, they sure did not want the police or any public notice.  They were scared, Mama got a check for 600.00 dollars and a promise of more later.  That fall we heard the big shots had been arrested and was later convicted of the largest land fraud in the U.S.A.    One year later I met your Grandfather and married him a year later on September 1, 1921, we stayed in Austin for a while then came to California.  We arrived in Los Angeles December 21, 1921.

That's the end of the story of my Granny's childhood.  I had not read this in quite sometime and was quite shocked!  My Granny was a very brave lady!  I remember her as being very talanted,  she could sew anything! knitt and crochet, she loved to do needle work and would make her own design's.   When we were little she would sew all of our school clothes, we would go to the fabric store and get to pick everything out, each child would get to spend three weeks out of the summer with her, she taught me about gardening, cooking, and decorating, and she loved nature, I would play house in her back yard, and make mud pie's, we would find earth worms together and she would let me keep them in the house in a shoe box for a day, so they would not die, then we would put them back. I have many many wonderful memories of her and I feel so blessed to have had her.  Hope you like her story, I apologize if it was a little shocking at times.happy-butterfly

August 14, 2010
8:11 am
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judydee
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Grandmatotwochicks,

Thank-you so very much for sharing this family history.  Don't worry about being shocking-it was a different time and place, and the nieces frequently tell us “Now is not like it was then!”.  Every family has such tales if they would but admit them.  You've given me the urge to get with the aunts (all 6 of them) and my mother and try to sort out a little more of ours.

August 14, 2010
8:32 am
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CATRAY44
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I loved the stories.  We are so comfortable and things come so easy, that I think we have lost a lot of charactor as a people.  I think it is encouraging to remember how strong and brave it is possible to be when the chips are down.  Your Grandma demonstrated a lot of grace in adversity!

August 16, 2010
4:08 pm
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Flatlander
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Just finished the last episode today..what a great story and what a wonderful woman your Grandmother was.

You are so blessed…having a grandmother while growing up.

August 16, 2010
4:27 pm
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Thank you for all of your wonderful replies!!! it means so much!  Yes Granny was a Great Lady, and a wondeful Mom to her three children, she did raise them through the depression alone!  she worked outside of the home six day's a week as a  beautician! and still canned, cooked, had a big garden, and sewed clothes.  On her only day off she would send the kid's out to play and cooked a week's worth of food for them.  In the late forties she had enough money to buy her own shop, so she was a business women as well.  They had chickens and horses that she rode in the Rose Parade in Pasadena, CA for years.  When things get tough around here I only have to think of her and her struggles, mine don't even compare to what she lived.  Glad you all liked the story of my Granny.happy-flower

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