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Major canning problem
January 2, 2014
11:47 pm
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holstein woman
Yankton, (St. Helens)Oregon
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In the last few weeks a friend and I have been canning soups. We canned them without extra salt because her husband can’t have it. My problem is that her canning is popping the tops and mine aren’t.

We did the work at my place and when it was completely cooled she moved it to her house. Mine is in a cold room, hers is put in a cabinet above her washing machine. She was wondering if it could be the vibration or the heat from maybe the washer to dryer? I would like to come up with an answer. 

Does anyone have any actual experience? We really need answers. I have canned for years and not had this kind of problem. Thank you all ahead of time.

January 3, 2014
10:25 am
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wvhomecanner
North Central WV
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first, what kind of soups and how did you process them?

 

Dede

If common sense were truly common, wouldn't there be more evidence of it?

January 3, 2014
1:32 pm
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holstein woman
Yankton, (St. Helens)Oregon
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Dede, I always precook ALL my soups and when I can them they pressure cook for 20 minutes @10 pounds pressure. I have canned this way with meats and soups for years. It can’t possibly be the way I process because we canned the soups together in the same pots. EXACTLY THE SAME TIME AND WAY. The only thing that is different is the storage and the fact she took hers to her house and stored it above the washer.

January 3, 2014
1:59 pm
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Pete
WV
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Have you double checked to make certain that the processing times are correct for the individual ingredients?  A lot of information is available here:

http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/general/selecting_correct_process_time.html

We all understand that you are canning soups the way that you have always done it, and that it seems to have always worked well for you.  However, we need to ask about the particulars in order to be able to answer your question properly.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

January 3, 2014
5:40 pm
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Miss Judy
West Central MO
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Sometimes one of the following can cause it to “unseal”:
1. little nicks or chips in the jar rim
2. food or grease on the jar rim ( I use a soft cloth dipped in warm vinegar water to wipe the rim before adjusting the lids)
3. rings not tight enough or rings with dents in them
4. jar lids not scalded before adjusting onto jars
5. too much liquid in jar that has spewed out during processing…causing food or grease to get on rim preventing a good seal
6. not following recommended time for the food needing the longest processing

All of that being said my friend had several jars of green beans come unsealed that were stored in a cabinet between her dishwasher and stove…the ones stored in her cool back bedroom did not unseal. However she processed the qts. for the amount of time for pints. confused
Maybe Ball web site could give you some answers

January 4, 2014
10:14 am
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holstein woman
Yankton, (St. Helens)Oregon
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Thank you ladies, I believe we came to the conclusion that it was from putting them in a “too warm” environment. She lost the biggest part of hers so I gave her another case of mine and she is going to store them in a colder place. Thank you all for your great help.

January 4, 2014
10:55 pm
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wvhomecanner
North Central WV
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Yes the warm environment may have caused the problem but I have to also say that it may have also been the short process time that contributed as well. Please consider increasing the times you process – tests have proven that soups that are half solids and half liquid in the jar need at least 60 minutes for pints and 75 for quarts to reach the internal temp necessary to kill off any nasties in the jar and assure that the contents are shelf stable. http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/soups.html     Soups that fill the jar with solids completely need 75/90 minutes.

Home canned goods are best stored at 50 to 70 degrees and it’s not recommended to store at temps over 95 degrees. I really don’t think her jars should have reacted like they did just because of temp in that cabinet over a washer.

 

 

dede

 

If common sense were truly common, wouldn't there be more evidence of it?

January 5, 2014
11:21 pm
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holstein woman
Yankton, (St. Helens)Oregon
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Thank you again Dede, I will pass the information along 

January 6, 2014
10:45 am
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Pete
WV
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Another question that has been nagging at me is if the jars were completely cooled prior to being moved.  Many canners say that they should be left undisturbed for at least 24 hours, or 48 hours in warmer weather, so that the seal could also cool and properly seat.  That is before moving them anywhere other than simply removing them from the canner.

I am in the habit of putting rings back on the sealed jars very loosely for transport.  No tightening because that can also interfere with the seating of the seal.  But, the rings are just there to protect the edges of the seals.

Just something to think about.  With all that is currently available now about canning, I’ve noticed that the cool down time is often not emphasized. 

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

January 6, 2014
10:52 am
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Miss Judy
West Central MO
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I’ve wondered that too Pete,…I won’t let my daughter take canned goods to her house until it has sat for a few days. When i take canned stuff home to Ohio (from Missouri) for my Mom I always make sure they have rings put back on them. Nothing is ever said about this in the canning books.

January 7, 2014
2:39 pm
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razzintaz
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Her storage room is too warm for any foodstuffs. Food should be stored at 60 degrees or less to last longer.

I am alarmed at your processing times. Plain clear broth can be pc’d for only 20 minutes, but once you put a solid in theyou they have to forces for 60 minutes for quarts and 75 minutes for quarts at the recommended weight for your altitude. Even when precooked. Then, after removing from canner, depending on if you are using metal lids : do not tighten after removal from canner; or Tattler lids: tighten after removal from canner, they need to be I disturbed for a minimum of 24 hours, but 36-48 hours is better. This allows the rubber seal so harden up, so that if it gets bumped the seal is not broken.

The cooler the temperature the longer the food will last. Above freezing, but under 60 is ideal, even for dry beans, rice, powdered milk, grains, canned goods from the grocery, home canned foods, condiments. 

I hope she has better luck.

February 4, 2014
1:14 pm
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Ross
Bel Air Maryland
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I always allow the full recommended processing time and pressure for all of my jars and I always check the latest recommendations each year. I always allow the jars an overnight on the table before moving them to the shelves. It allows me to make sure they are sealed and clean and gives me time to label them.

 

February 6, 2014
1:37 pm
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bonita
north east IL
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I’d like to suggest a bit of caution with the bones and dogs. Depending on how cooked the bones are—and how aggressive your dog is with them—the bones may splinter as your dog munches on them. (Read: splinter just like cooked chicken bones.)

Save the Earth. It's the only planet with chocolate.

February 6, 2014
10:42 pm
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bonita
north east IL
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opps, the above was supposed to post to “soup bones” question, sorry

Save the Earth. It's the only planet with chocolate.

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