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A new adventure in Canning: what do you think??
July 26, 2012
9:20 am
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Country Doodle
Hamilton / Oxford Ohio
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Ok, ladies & gent’s: riddle me this one: I have been looking on line at different types of storage for different types of foods, I have been canning since I was old enough to work along side the elders in my family. I grew up in the city but spent every summer till I left home on a very large working farm. My grandparents raised probably 80% of their food. We made everything, but I have never heard of this recipe below? Have any of you?? I’m thinking how genius this would and could be! Especially for all of you that raise your own dairy products <img class="spSmiley" title="moo" onclick="spjEdInsertSmiley(‘moo.gif’, ‘moo’, ‘https://chickensintheroad.com/wp-content/forum-smileys/’, ‘moo‘);” src=”/wp-content/forum-smileys/moo.gif” alt=”moo” />. Any who: could you all let me know your thoughts on this recipe/ideal? this, if it would work would be a great solution for I would think a lot of people, me being one of them! for fall and winter storage, to give as gifts and prepare for an upcoming season for personal use. I have yet to go to the webpage included in the recipe: I may do that here in a bit. I’m sorry but I don’t know the rules on posting others web information: however, this page that I got this off of, I can find no information on it not being aloud not to be reprinted:: so here it is, http://www.endtimesreport.com/canning_butter.html  & if I have done somethin ilegal here just let me know! and I will not do it again:)

Excited to start a new recipe,<img class="spSmiley" title="happy-flower" onclick="spjEdInsertSmiley(‘happyflower.gif’, ‘happy-flower’, ‘https://chickensintheroad.com/wp-content/forum-smileys/’, ‘happy-flower‘);” src=”/wp-content/forum-smileys/happyflower.gif” alt=”happy-flower” />

Sandy

 

Jars of canned butter<img class="spSmiley" title="chef" onclick="spjEdInsertSmiley(‘chef.gif’, ‘chef’, ‘https://chickensintheroad.com/wp-content/forum-smileys/’, ‘chef‘);” src=”/wp-content/forum-smileys/chef.gif” alt=”chef” />

Now you can purchase canned butter from The Internet Grocer http://www.internet-grocer.net/butter.htm or make it yourself using the directions below.

1.   Use any butter that is on sale. Lesser quality butter requires more shaking (see #5 below), but the results are the same as with the expensive brands.

2.   Heat pint jars in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings or seals. One pound of butter slightly more than fills one pint jar, so if you melt 11 pounds of butter, heat 12 pint jars. A roasting pan works well for holding the pint jars while in the oven.

3.  While the jars are heating, melt butter slowly until it comes to a slow boil. Using a large spatula, stir the bottom of the pot often to keep the butter from scorching. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes at least: a good simmer time will lessen the amount of shaking required (see #5 below). Place the lids in a small pot and bring to a boil, leaving the lids in simmering water until needed.

4.   Stirring the melted butter from the bottom to the top with a soup ladle or small pot with a handle, pour the melted butter carefully into heated jars through a canning jar funnel. Leave 3/4″ of head space in the jar, which allows room for the shaking process.

5.   Carefully wipe off the top of the jars, then get a hot lid from the simmering water, add the lid and ring and tighten securely. Lids will seal as they cool. Once a few lids “ping,” shake while the jars are still warm, but cool enough to handle easily, because the butter will separate and become foamy on top and white on the bottom. In a few minutes, shake again, and repeat until the butter retains the same consistency throughout the jar.

6.   At this point, while still slightly warm, put the jars into a refrigerator. While cooling and hardening, shake again, and the melted butter will then look like butter and become firm. This final shaking is very important! Check every 5 minutes and give the jars a little shake until they are hardened in the jar! Leave in the refrigerator for an hour.

7.   Canned butter should store for 3 years or longer on a cool, dark shelf. [It does last a long time.  We have just used up the last of the butter we canned in 1999, and it was fine after 5 years.] Canned butter does not “melt” again when opened, so it does not need to be refrigerated upon opening, provided it is used within a reasonable length of time.

A lovely glow seems to emanate from every jar. You will also be glowing with grateful satisfaction while placing this “sunshine in a jar” on your pantry shelves.

We have canned over 75 pints of butter in the past year. Miles loves it and will open a jar when I’m not looking! I buy butter on sale, and then keep it frozen until I have enough for canning 2 or 3 batches of a dozen jars each.

July 26, 2012
9:47 am
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mammaleigh
NW Georgia
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That is really interesting! I have never heard of canning my own butter…u am going to look more in to it. I know that dede us one of the many canning experts we have here. I am curious what she might say….

"Don't go around saying the world owes you a living.  The world owes you nothing.  It was here first."  ~Mark Twain

July 26, 2012
12:36 pm
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Ruthmarie
Northern CA
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Whut-ho! since this butter has been melted and cooled, is it usable in recipes that call for cubed butter, ie cookies?  I know the occasions I’ve used overly soft (summer room temp) and re-chilled butter in a piped cookie, it took more flour to obtain the right consistency, making a crunchier cookie.  Not necessarily a bad thing unless unexpected, just a thought … otherwise, what an interesting idea! 

Bet you could take this another step further and clarify the butter … which should eliminate the shaking which is re-mixing the milk solids back into the fat.  Now clarified butter would be brilliant glory <img class="spSmiley" title="sun2" onclick="spjEdInsertSmiley(‘sun2.gif’, ‘sun2’, ‘https://chickensintheroad.com/wp-content/forum-smileys/’, ‘sun2‘);” src=”/wp-content/forum-smileys/sun2.gif” alt=”sun2″ />on the shelf!

July 27, 2012
8:00 am
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BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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Canning butter is in no way a recommended thing and honestly can be dangerous.  It is low acid, and high risk.  Do people do it?  No doubt, but I don’t think anyone here on the management side is going to support it.  We stick to what we know can be done safely for obvious reasons.  I do buy butter in bulk, on sale and freeze some, and keep a small jar of clarified butter on hand, which keeps very very well without canning to use, though not large quantities.

Located in N.E. Ohio

July 27, 2012
9:21 am
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Country Doodle
Hamilton / Oxford Ohio
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Thank you, for the comments, yes canning butter? very questionable?? but also very interesting if in fact it could be done? and done safely? I’m thinking of giving it a try, just maybe a pint: (then I’m not out to much $$) I am in the process of putting a book together on “self reliance” type topics: things that are part of our history and culture: getting back to basics so to speak. Knowing how to survive without the aid of technology is an art form I think a lot of people just don’t have any longer: so I am trying to put a “how to” book together for my future grandchildren (my son is 9, so I have some time: hee hee)

But were all so spoiled, re: having stuff so handy; and readily available to us. I so envy some of you living on and off the land: growing up it was something that I dreaded doing every summer, now I wish I could just go back: things were so much simpler.

Again, I’m hoping to learn lot’s from all these different “forum posts” I just so am appreciative of all you’re all’s knowledge: thanks bunches!!!

 

XOXOXO

Sandy

July 27, 2012
11:06 am
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Squeegees Mom
South Texas
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Not trying to be controversial, and I am NOT a canner, but I do recall my Grandparents in Missouri getting commodities (Boxes of food staples vs food stamps) that contained canned butter 40 or so years ago. Maybe commercially canned is processed differently than home canned?

July 27, 2012
11:11 am
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Ruthmarie
Northern CA
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Yea, BE, knew someone had a line to the how-to or not … I do recall reading somewhere that clarified butter would keep a looooong time in the frig (or out, as India has had a handle on that for centuries).  I figured it had much to do with removing all the proteins and leaving that pure, golden fat.  Does make sense that one never sees, except in anecdotal experience, instructions for canning butter for long shelf storage.

July 27, 2012
11:41 am
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Ross
Bel Air Maryland
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Butter has enough water in it to keep it from being heated above 212 degrees F. at atmospheric pressure. It can be dried by heating it to about 250 degrees F. until it stops bubbling as I do with rendered fats. Once the water is eliminated it will keep without going rancid for quite a while. I suppose that if I were given a forty pound block I would experiment with pressure canning it.

Fresh is always best, frozen or canned is very good, cured, smoked and dried works but produces a product with limited uses.

July 27, 2012
9:43 pm
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wvhomecanner
North Central WV
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Here’s what the NCHFP/USDA says:

 

Should I use directions for canning butter at home that I see on the Internet?
Indeed, there are some directions for ‘canning’ butter in circulation on the Internet. Most of what we have seen are not really canning, as they do not have Boiling Water or Pressure Canning processes applied to the filled jar. Jars are preheated, the butter is melted down and poured into the jars, and the lids are put on the jars. Some directions say to put the jars in the refrigerator as they re-harden, but to keep shaking them at regular intervals to keep the separating butter better mixed as it hardens. This is merely storing butter in canning jars, not ‘canning’. True home canning is when the food is heated enough to destroy or sufficiently acid enough to prevent growth of all spores of Clostridium botulinum (that causes botulism) and other pathogens during room temperature storage on the shelf.

Additionally, when you consider the economics of the process (energy costs involved with heating, cost of jars and lids, etc.), even if the butter is bought on sale, it may not be economically viable to prepare butter to store for years in this manner. Good quality butter is readily available at all times, if butter is needed for fresh use. If the concern is about emergency food supplies, there are dry forms of butter that can be purchased and stored, oils that can be used in an emergency, or commercially canned butter in tins (although we have only seen this for sale from other countries). Melted and re-hardened butter may not function the same as original butter in many types of baking anyway.

There are a few issues with the common directions circulating on the Internet at this time (Spring 2006):

  1. Physical safety and food quality: In the provided directions, the jars are preheated in an oven (dry-heat), which is not recommended for canning jars. Manufacturers of canning jars do not recommend baking or oven canning in the jars. It is very risky with regard to causing jar breakage. There is no guarantee that the jars heated in this dry manner are sufficiently heated to sterilize them, as we do not have data on sterilizing jar surfaces by this dry-heating method.
  2. The butter is not really being ‘canned’; it is simply being melted and put in canning jars, and covered with lids. Due to some heat present from the hot melted butters and preheated jars, some degree of vacuum is pulled on the lids to develop a seal. It rarely is as strong a vacuum as you obtain in jars sealed through heat processing. The practice in these ‘canned’ butter directions is referred to as ‘open-kettle’ canning in our terminology, which is really no canning at all, since the jar (with product in it) is not being heat processed before storage.
  3. Although mostly fat, butter is a low-acid food. Meat, vegetables, butter, cream, etc. are low-acid products that will support the outgrowth of C. botulinum and toxin formation in a sealed jar at room temperature. Low-acid products have to be pressure-canned by tested processes to be kept in a sealed jar at room temperature. It is not clear what the botulism risk is from such a high-fat product, but to store a low-acid moist food in a sealed jar at room temperature requires processing to destroy spores. A normal salted butter has about 16-17% water, some salt, protein, vitamins and minerals. Some butter-like spreads have varying amounts of water in them. We have no kind of database in the home canning/food processing arena to know what the microbiological concerns would be in a butter stored at room temperature in a sealed jar. In the absence of that, given that it is low-acid and that fats can protect spores from heat if they are in the product during a canning process, we cannot recommend storing butter produced by these methods under vacuum sealed conditions at room temperature.
  4. Some other directions do call for ‘canning’ the filled jars of butter in a dry oven. This also is not ‘canning’. There is not sufficient, research-based documentation to support that ‘canning’ any food in a dry oven as described on this web page or any page that proposes oven canning is even sufficient heating to destroy bacteria of concern, let alone enough to produce a proper seal with today’s home canning lids.

    In conclusion, with no testing having been conducted to validate these methods, we would NOT recommend or endorse them as a safe home-canning process, let alone for storing butter at room temperature for an extended period. We do know that the methods given for preheating empty jars, or even filled jars, in a dry oven are not recommended by the jar manufacturers or by us for any food. Aside from the physical safety and quality issues, and the fact that it is not canning at all, if there happened to be spores of certain bacteria in there, these procedures will not destroy those spores for safe room temperature storage.

If common sense were truly common, wouldn't there be more evidence of it?

July 29, 2012
3:50 pm
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fruit loop
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I haven’t tried canning butter, but a number of my friends do, and they’ve never had a problem with it.

We just buy ours on sale and freeze it.  We use butter fairly quickly for baking, so we’d have to buy more than we could afford to make canning it worthwhile.

July 30, 2012
12:25 pm
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Country Doodle
Hamilton / Oxford Ohio
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Thanks folks for all your input, canning butter is just one of the many things that I have seen in food preservation, ya know storing up for a catastrophe:: lol, let’s pray we are never there!, any who:: I found the topic interesting: thought of all my friends out in Cyber Land: who have dairy cows, and thought wow, they might benefit from at least knowing about this topic, whether the give it a try?? up to them. I’m all about “waste not; want not” kind of attitude.

 

I try and keep at least 4 month’s of canned and frozen products for the winter months: spring summer and fall, well if I have anything left over?? I just use as I go. Canned a new jam yesterday: strawberry bananna:::OMG or Danger Danger Will Robinson, it was and is so sooo good! my best yet! if I do say so myself::: nothing like tooting your own horn.

 

lol

Thanks again for the input: it’s always welcome!heart

July 30, 2012
2:21 pm
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bonita
north east IL
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I’m confused. I see that you are planning ahead for a catastrophe. To me, that would require setting aside essentials, staples, simple to prepare foods that have great nutritional value. That said, what would be the purpose of caning butter. Butter doesn’t seem to be an essential food. Olive oils and unflavored veg oils can suffice for all cooking. Lard and shortening cover the baking needs. If there were truly a catastrophe I’d sooner see beans, rice and veggies in my stockpile than butter. JMHO

Save the Earth. It's the only planet with chocolate.

July 30, 2012
2:36 pm
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Country Doodle
Hamilton / Oxford Ohio
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Bonita,

 

I was surfing one night looking for canning recipes: and just came across the topic. Thought it was very interesting, I know lots of folks on this sight have dairy cows?? Hence me thinking they might be interested? I would use it for bread, biscuits & say maybe pancakes:

 

A Catastrophe on my end: whelp being w/ electric or water for over 10 days was not an easy feet to handle. We were in the middle of a very hot summer, and had huricane winds blow our way::::Our whole area was without (depending on what side of the road you lived::) we lost lot’s of food, due to having no electric, & not having water made even worse! now I hope and pray we don’t have an issue again, however I have a new found lease on preparing for issues that might arise. We loose power quite a lot due to high winds: it’s kind of the county joke::lol. I freeze and can for emergency’s and to be able to use come colder months, holiday’s & just to feed my family:: however, if the issue is ever raised again? My family will I hope not go hungry or without basic necessities.

I come from also a long line of “Preppers”,  kind of a touchy subject for most folks, so I kind of don’t bring up that topic to much (of course: unless your really curios (just ask)) I try not to talk to much about it. I don’t want to give off a “wrong impression” or have someone think I’m a whacko, lol

 

S~

July 31, 2012
10:40 am
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Christy Miller
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Country Doodle, This forum is for sharing knowledge. And as the woman in chapter 31 of Proverbs…we consider it. Thank you. Thinking ahead and being prepared for unknown events is wise. Sharing the knowledge you have gained with us would be wonderful. I believe most of us here do some type of preparations, anything from having enough of whatever meds we take, to food,water, etc. So many events in our lives are just made easier if we are prepared. Share if you will and if others are willing to hear.

July 31, 2012
12:19 pm
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Country Doodle
Hamilton / Oxford Ohio
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Christy,

Hi, thank you for the warm reply, I appreciate your comment.hello

I have been told by some that they are quite impressed w/ my capabilities re: “preparing for winter” or what the elders in my family called “the white death” lol, my family is scattered in the mountains of KY and originated in WV. They were and some still are deep rooted farmers: they raise their crops, to provide for their families and some time’s neighbors if they are in need. I was taught at a very early age the importance of being wise and preparing, because if you are not prepared for your future: you future might just in fact eat you alive. As with all aspects of our lives; we had to do well in school, to prepare for our jobs, if we did not do well in our home, this would and could affect our mental health, if we did not prepare and do well re: our land, the land would and will consume you!::: the list can go on and on. Being prepared, even my 9 year old will say:”my mama is kinda crazy about that” lol, he is being taught right now, one thing at a time. It’s hard to instill how important the little things in life are to a child: most important, be a kid for gosh sakes! ( I despise the little electronic gizmo’s he has) I tell him all the time “go find a tree” mud, get to know it:::mud is your friend!!! hee hee

I saw the article re: canning butter on a web sight that is included in the recipe: it is very informative and it has some great links available:::check those out, if in fact you would be interested: we all have different view’s on “Catastrophe’s” or what to do if in fact something was to happen, well I don’t want to be “Debbie Downer” but just in case something does happen, like I said, my people w/in a 15 mile radius; know where they are to go for a hot meal and a warm bed: and a cool drink of water. As long as my house is still standing that is! lol: and my water cisterns don’t implode::::lol, We will I hope go on for at least a while:: till we can plant again!

August 6, 2012
9:16 pm
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Country Doodle
Hamilton / Oxford Ohio
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OK, another riddle::: what are you all paying for your fresh produce out there in Cyberville? we grow some::but w/ very little rain, our garden is not doing so hot:: I paid $38 for a bush of 1/2 runners:: 3 weeks ago, went back to a road side vendor on this past Sunday: she wanted $50, yes I said “ok” and left::: as politely as I could:::sorry but $50 is pushing it:: 2yrs ago I gave $25 ??? I know were in a drought, recession, crazy world, but dang::$50 for beans???? any who, just was wanting some feed back.

XOXOXO

S~

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