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canning beans
October 27, 2010
11:16 am
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BeckyW
Kansas
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Can you elaborate on the beans a little more please…I will assume it's
1 cup of beans to a quart jar then add water?  1/2″ headspace?  What if
you do a batch of beans by themselves?  How long and how much
pressure?  Thanks!

October 27, 2010
11:18 am
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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Becky, I moved your post over here so we can find this topic by the topic title later when we need to look back at the info!

Clover made me do it.

October 27, 2010
12:43 pm
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wvhomecanner
North Central WV
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The 'rules' say that fully rehydrated beans should be used (and jars can be filled full of them), but on the Canning2 group there have been loads of people that have found that washing dried beans and putting them right in the jar works just fine. Thus the “about 1/3 full” of beans per jar and boiling water to fill and leave one inch headspace. You can season if you wish, but keep in mind that you can't remove seasoning but you can add it later. And that salt will give you firmer beans.

Now, the NCHFP/USDA gives recipes for baked beans, beans with tomato and/or molasses, etc. and says to process 65 minutes for pints and 75 for quarts. Oh and that can include “3/4 inch cube of” pork of some sort. But these have some pre-soaking and pre-cooking going on. For unsoaked beans (and the easiest) go for the times for meat. 75 for pints/90 for quarts. No matter what way you can beans (naked or adorned) ALWAYS be sure they are in plenty of liquid or you'll get 'bean bricks'. Sometimes absorption continues on the shelf. As one member on C2 always says “soupy, soupy, soupy” going in the jar.

 

Dede

If common sense were truly common, wouldn't there be more evidence of it?

October 27, 2010
12:49 pm
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BeckyW
Kansas
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So would you pressure can these then?  If so, would you use the same pounds as for beans that were already presoaked?

October 27, 2010
1:31 pm
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Paws_Bakery
Southern Ontario
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Dede,

You used the soupy, soupy, soupy term that I was thinking, making sure you don't get the bean bricks.

Becky,

yes these are pressure canned.  The pounds would stay the same whether the beans are pre-soaked or not, it is the processing time that changes.

Hugs Cheryl   butterfly

October 27, 2010
2:12 pm
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wvhomecanner
North Central WV
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Yes, pressure can. ALL low acid foods must be pressure canned. So unless it's a fruit or pickled or something primarily tomato with some acid added, it needs pressure canned. No way around it.

How many pounds pressure you use for canning is entirely dependent on what altitude you are at –

Internal canner pressures (and therefore temperatures) are lower at higher altitudes. Canners

If common sense were truly common, wouldn't there be more evidence of it?

October 27, 2010
2:20 pm
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wvhomecanner
North Central WV
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OOPS sent before I finished it :)

And Cheryl is right, the TIMES change as to whether there is pre-prepping.

The pounds of pressure are dependent on your altitude, not the product in the jar.

Clear as mud? 

 

Dede

at work and answering in sporadic moments  poke    sorry if I have confused more than helped lol!

If common sense were truly common, wouldn't there be more evidence of it?

July 6, 2013
12:59 pm
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ms13tink
alberta Canada
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how do you can baked beans that are fully cooked( homemade)

July 7, 2013
9:55 am
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Pete
WV
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Thanks, ms13tink, for giving us the opportunity to point out to our newer readers that we have a pinned topic in the Canning/Preservation section of the forum for links on the subject:

https://chickensintheroad.com/forum/the-canning-pot/canning-links/

This link is prominently posted because it is the source for all sorts of charts and the latest research on safe canning practices:

http://nchfp.uga.edu/

Please take the time to look around that link for all the latest and greatest information, recipes, and more.  Lots and lots of useful stuff there.  And it is the standard we use here at CitR for safe canning and preservation practices.

Don’t feel bad, ms13tink, if you had not found that section yet!  There is a LOT of information on this forum and it takes a while to figure out how to find it all.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

July 7, 2013
10:19 am
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BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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Because beans have to be pressure canned for the whole time in order to be safe, whether they are cooked or not, the least cooked before hand is best.   I understand that you want to cook them ahead so they are seasoned the way you like, especially so you can take them camping… but that tends to turn them into the texture and consistency of a refried bean brick in a jar. 

I would suggest you prep, start and season they way you know you like them, but only start them cooking for as little time as possible.  Then you fill your jars and pressure can at the recommended times and if you read the posts above yours here in this thread, you’ll see a lot of the information you’ll need to do that right. 

Having a Ball Blue Book, and/or some of the web sites which give good safety info will be helpful all the time such as the NCHFP and the Ball canning site.  Here’s the link that will also help you find all sorts of helpful info. 

Here at CItR we try to only give canning info that doesn’t include doing much ‘just like granny’ did, because while I ate all that stuff too and am here to tell of it, I wouldn’t risk it any more because of a lot of reasons.  Here’s the link to the link thread.  chicken  chicken  chicken

https://chickensintheroad.com/forum/the-canning-pot/canning-links/ 

Located in N.E. Ohio

July 7, 2013
10:43 am
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mamajoseph
Kenya
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I have done a lot of canning of dried beans lately and I do the “soaked beans” method, meaning I don’t precook them at all but I soak them overnight. I have not yet found the seasoning formula I like for baked beans, but the closest was filling the jars with the soaked beans (half full), then adding a squirt of ketchup, some brown sugar, salt and onion powder. Top off with hot water, then can according to instructions.

I (sorta) have a farm in Africa.

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