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Moving Donkeys

Apr
18

The donkey whisperer:

When moving a pair of donkeys, you only actually need to move one. The girl. The boy will be self-moving if you move the girl.


First, you have to get the boy to let go of the girl.

Jack: “Don’t leave me, my beloved!”

But she left him.

And he followed.

Down the driveway and down the road to the gate in the middle pasture. The donkeys come up in the fall to eat down the overgrowth in the goat yard and winter up top. Now it’s time to go back down for the spring and summer.

The sheep had forgotten about donkeys. They ran from Jack like their tails were on fire.

They’ll get over it.

The donkeys are down!

It MUST be spring!

Here’s a little donkey-sheep interaction just for fun:



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Posted by Suzanne McMinn on April 18, 2011  

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Comments

17 Responses | RSS feed for comments on this post

  1. 4-18
    5:20
    am

    Ain’t it the truth, when my son was little, he is 32yrs old now, we had a jack and jenny. And all you had to do was lead jenny around and jack blindly followed. He did not care where he was going or why, he just dutifully followed. And it was OMG if you tried to separate them. We had a little cart that we could attach to the jenny to take the kids for a ride around the farm. It was made out of two bicycle frames minus the front wheels, with a wooden bench between the two frames. Looked like the riding cart that jockeys use. thanks for sharing, Marla

  2. 4-18
    6:19
    am

    :happyflower: Reminds me of the old song by Carole King.
    Where you lead I will follow!! :happyflower:
    Granny Trace
    http://www.grannytracescrapsandsquares.com

  3. 4-18
    6:32
    am

    I was going to make a comment along the lines of: “she chased him until he caught her”, but I think he was the one doing the chasing this time! Guess she’s already “caught him”.
    Cute post!

  4. 4-18
    8:10
    am

    Funny. Thanks! :sheepjump:

  5. 4-18
    8:25
    am

    It’s good to see Annabelle still bouncing, even without her buddy. Does she seem to miss Boomer?

  6. 4-18
    9:47
    am

    I’m sure things will get to the settled state if it isn’t already. Nice.

  7. 4-18
    11:00
    am

    As I watched the video I thought that was Annabelle barking…remembering the days she thought she was a dog.

  8. 4-18
    11:26
    am

    My goodness, Jack is certainly attached to Pokey. Do all donkeys get that close to each other? Does make it easier to move them doesn’t it.
    Suzanne

  9. 4-18
    12:15
    pm

    OMG… I was in such a terrible mood until I saw Annibelle cavorting around the pasture with poky & jack. We have a winter storm watch out for 6+ inches of snow for tomorrow. Jeez! Thanks for the day brightener!

  10. 4-18
    12:20
    pm

    I love your videos. they give me a chance to see and hear all the sights and sounds of spring, and they’re wonderful.

  11. 4-18
    12:45
    pm

    Annabelle is still just the cutest sheep. I don’t blame the sheep at all for running off — donkeys are not always the nicest of critters. I am glad they have each other. though.

  12. 4-18
    2:53
    pm

    Annabelle is just TOO STINKING CUTE when she runs! Also, I think with a little training those donkeys would make awesome sheep herders.

  13. 4-18
    4:40
    pm

    Oh thank you so much for sharing it all with us I so enjoyed this post and the video really made my day. I love to see Annabelel bounce she is such a cutie.

  14. 4-18
    6:30
    pm

    When is sheep shearing time?

  15. 4-18
    6:33
    pm

    I just showed my grandaughter you last video yesterday, which she LOVED. Can’t wait to show her this one! She loves Jack by the way~!

  16. 4-18
    6:54
    pm

    Jan, it’s sheep shearing time now or was a month ago, LOL. I’ll have the shearer out here soon.

  17. 4-20
    3:10
    pm

    That is soooo funny how they hop.

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