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Lemon Curd - Canned
January 4, 2010
5:34 pm
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Pete
WV
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Canned Lemon Curd

2½ cups superfine sugar*

½ cup lemon zest (freshly zested), optional

1 cup bottled lemon juice**

¾ cup unsalted butter, chilled, cut into approximately ¾" pieces

7 large egg yolks

4 large whole eggs

Special Equipment Needed: lemon zester, balloon whisk, 1½ quart double boiler*** (the top double boiler pan should be at least 1½-quart volume), strainer, kitchen thermometer measuring at least up to 180°F, glass or stainless steel medium mixing bowl, silicone spatula or cooking spoon, and equipment for boiling water canning.

Yield: About 3 to 4 half-pint jars

1. Wash 4 half-pint canning jars with warm, soapy water. Rinse well; keep hot until ready to fill. Prepare canning lids according to manufacturer's directions.

2. Fill boiling water canner with enough water to cover the filled jars by 1 to 2 inches. Use a thermometer to preheat the water to 180°F by the time filled jars are ready to be added.

Caution: Do not heat the water in the canner to more than 180°F before jars are added. If the water in the canner is too hot when jars are added, the process time will not be long enough. The time it takes for the canner to reach boiling after the jars are added is expected to be 25 to 30 minutes for this product. Process time starts after the water in the canner comes to a full boil over the tops of the jars.

3. Combine the sugar and lemon zest in a small bowl, stir to mix, and set aside about 30 minutes. Pre-measure the lemon juice and prepare the chilled butter pieces.

4. Heat water in the bottom pan of the double boiler until it boils gently. The water should not boil vigorously or touch the bottom of the top double boiler pan or bowl in which the curd is to be cooked. Steam produced will be sufficient for the cooking process to occur.

5. In the top of the double boiler, on the counter top or table, whisk the egg yolks and whole eggs together until thoroughly mixed. Slowly whisk in the sugar and zest, blending until well mixed and smooth. Blend in the lemon juice and then add the butter pieces to the mixture.

6. Place the top of the double boiler over boiling water in the bottom pan. Stir gently but continuously with a silicone spatula or cooking spoon, to prevent the mixture from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Continue cooking until the mixture reaches a temperature of 170°F. Use a food thermometer to monitor the temperature.

7. Remove the double boiler pan from the stove and place on a protected surface, such as a dish cloth or towel on the counter top. Continue to stir gently until the curd thickens (about 5 minutes). Strain curd through a mesh strainer into a glass or stainless steel bowl; discard collected zest.

8. Fill hot strained curd into the clean, hot half-pint jars, leaving ½-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened, clean paper towel; apply two-piece metal canning lids.

9. Process in the prepared boiling water canner according to the recommendations in Table 1. Let cool, undisturbed, for 12 to 24 hours and check for seals.

Process Time at Altitudes of

Style of Pack

Jar Size

0 – 1,000 ft

1,001 – 6,000 ft

Above 6,000 ft

Hot

Half-pints

15 min

20

25

Shelf Life: For best quality, store in a cool, dark place (away from light). Plan to use canned lemon curd within 3 to 4 months. Browning and/or separation may occur with longer storage; discard any time these changes are observed. 

 Preparation Notes:  *If superfine sugar is not available, run granulated sugar through a grinder or food processor for 1 minute, let settle, and use in place of superfine sugar. Do not use powdered sugar.

**Bottled lemon juice is used to standardize acidity. Fresh lemon juice can vary in acidity and is not recommended.

*** If a double boiler is not available, a substitute can be made with a large bowl or saucepan that can fit partway down into a saucepan of a smaller diameter. If the bottom pan has a larger diameter, the top bowl or pan should have a handle(s) that can rest on the rim of the lower pan.

Variation:  For Lime Curd, use the same recipe but substitute 1 cup bottled lime juice and ¼ cup fresh lime zest for the lemon juice and zest.

Other citrus or fruit curds are not recommended for canning at this time.

From http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_02/lemon_curd.html

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

January 4, 2010
8:42 pm
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Valerie
East Central Minnesota
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Thanks so much for this recipe. Once I got the canning bug, first thing I looked up was lemon curd and I was so disappointed to read it can't be canned. To know that I can make this and preserve makes me very happy.

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." – Groucho Marx

January 4, 2010
9:13 pm
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Farmgirl wannabe
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Don't you just absolutely adore people who are made happy by such simple and basic things in life, like canning lemon curd.  I hope it turns out well for you, I am going to try it this month.

October 1, 2011
3:03 pm
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Homekeepn
Southern Maine
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Has anyone canned this recipe using a pint instead of a half pint. I wondered if it would not be recommended using a larger sized jar. If so how long did you process for the pints?

We find that we go through half pints of anything too quickly at my house to bother using them.  

Cathy

Living the country life with the hubs, the kids are along for the hayride.

October 1, 2011
4:27 pm
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Pete
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No, and since it is recommended that half pints be used, that is all that I would use.  Just checked the link and there doesn't seem to be an update for larger jars.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

October 1, 2011
6:20 pm
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wvhomecanner
North Central WV
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It's a better bet to freeze this if you want to store larger quantities. When the USDA/UGA recommend a certain size jar it's because that is the size that through testing gave the safest and best quality product.

 

dede

If common sense were truly common, wouldn't there be more evidence of it?

October 2, 2011
8:18 am
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Joyce
Western WV
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Is the amount of lemon zest in this recipe correct,  half a cup seems to be a very large amount?

October 2, 2011
1:45 pm
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Pete
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All I can tell you is that is what they say!  Correct or not - well, since all their recipes and recommendations are tested and tested, I would guess it to be correct.  But, they have probably made a typo or two, just like the rest of us.  Then again, since it's been there a while now, perhaps someone would have pointed it out by now if it were a typo?

In my limited experience with lemon curd, it sounds about right here.  Lemon curd is not lemon pudding.  Kinda hard to describe - something like a cross between lemon pudding and jelly?  Or jello?  Very tart and thicker than pudding.  But more like pudding than any other food category.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

October 2, 2011
2:39 pm
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Miss HomeEcs Daughter
Central Texas
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Joyce said:

Is the amount of lemon zest in this recipe correct,  half a cup seems to be a very large amount?

It does sound like alot but...when you think about the total amount of curd, not so much.  That averages out to about 2 T per jar.  Really not so much for good sweet pucker power! 

 

Lemon Curd ROCKS!!!  open the jar and gimmie a spoon!!!

October 2, 2011
10:25 pm
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Homekeepn
Southern Maine
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Thanks to all for your replies. I guess I should round up some half pints then. All well I tried. I had a feeling that with the curd being so thick that a larger size jar just wouldn't process to a safe temperature.

Cathy

Living the country life with the hubs, the kids are along for the hayride.

July 29, 2012
4:15 pm
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fruit loop
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We made Lemon Curd for the first time last year.  Have to use it quickly as it tends to go bad very fast.  Not sure why.

July 31, 2012
9:31 am
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mamajoseph
Kenya
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I love lemon-y stuff but have never made lemon curd. Seems very rich and so I wonder do you eat it straight or use it in recipes? If so, what's your favorite?

I (sorta) have a farm in Africa.

August 4, 2012
2:35 pm
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Pete
WV
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Mamaj, my favorite way to use lemon curd is with a buttered, warm scone.  You can also make tiny tarts with it - or even larger tarts.  Or as others have suggested, with a spoon straight from the jar!

Think of it as a sauce that you might drizzle over bread pudding, for instance.  As a filling for tarts is probably the most common use?

We really need some of our British chicken sisters to weigh in on this one.  I just know that I like it!

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

August 4, 2012
9:34 pm
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justdeborah2002
ottawa ON
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Not quite British, Canadian here, but my grandparents were fresh off the boat.  

As a child, I didn't like lemon curd, nor anything else lemon (not sweet enough), but watched my parents and grandparents eat lemon curd spread on toast in the morning.  Drizzled over pound cake for a pudding, shortbreads dipped into an almost empty jar of curd to get the last smidge out, and yes, even just a spoon would do in a pinch.  Entire tarts would be filled with curd, or centers of doughnuts or danishes.  Spooned over blueberries.

Gosh, is there anything you can't pair with lemon curd?

queen of make it fit

August 5, 2012
8:03 am
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Pete
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Ooooh.  A trifle made with pound cake, lemon curd, and whipped cream.  Maybe with some fresh blueberries.  Sounds yummy!

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

August 5, 2012
3:28 pm
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mamajoseph
Kenya
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Sounds great. I love scones and have the simplest recipe ever for them. It's actually not my recipe, but from BHG magazine. Similar probably to what is sometimes known as cream biscuits. No cutting in of fat; you just use heavy cream and it counts for the fat and the milk.

I (sorta) have a farm in Africa.

September 17, 2012
2:07 am
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STH
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mamajoseph, I made this tart earlier this summer to use up a jar of lemon curd (leftover from a Christmas gift) and it was just delicious:  http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-lemon-yogurt-ice-box-tart-recipes-from-the-kitchn-169454.  Fantastic light dessert for hot weather.  I used homemade nonfat Greek yogurt in mine.

September 17, 2012
2:19 pm
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mamajoseph
Kenya
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Yum. Making our big trip to Nairobi (for re-stocking) next week and I'm definitely buying the stuff to make this. Hens are laying and cows are happy so plenty of butter and eggs on hand.

I (sorta) have a farm in Africa.

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