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What are Hanovers??
December 27, 2009
9:33 pm
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mountainwoman
French Creek, WV
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My family used to grow this root vegetable and Mom canned it.  But I can't find it in any of the seed catalogs or even googling it.  It looks like a very large, fat orange carrot-type root and may be a type of rutabaga.  Somehow I think the name Hanover is either a regional name (central WV) or it came from the early Pennsylvania Dutch who moved here to WV in the mid-1700's.  It was boiled with some bacon grease for seasoning and we had cornbread to go with it and the broth.  Have any of you every heard of Hanovers??

Deanna

December 27, 2009
9:42 pm
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

December 27, 2009
11:28 pm
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Pete
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Will try to remember to ask at the Capitol Market to see if anyone there knows anything about them.  Of course, right now there isn't anyone there who sells seedlings, but it can't hurt to ask.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

December 28, 2009
7:31 am
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mountainwoman
French Creek, WV
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Thanks for the information.  I never thought of Google Books.  Duh!  I was pretty sure that Hanovers are rutabagas.  And that the name is a regional thing.  I knew that Hanover is a German name.  Many of the early German settlers here in America came because a series of wars had devastated their land and farms.  Rutabagas were a staple of their diet and was looked down upon as a lowly food that only the poor ate.  They sailed into Philadelphia in the early 1700's and then settled in eastern Pennsylvania, then moved south into Maryland and Virginia.   They were the original Pennsylvania Dutch (Deutch).   Even before the Revolutionary War, some of them moved westward into what would become West Virginia.   I know a lot of the older people around here still raise Hanovers and insist that they are not rutabagas, they're Hanovers.   I think our Appalachian language is fascinating and, unfortunately, disappearing as we become more global.

Enough history.  Hanovers are very good when boiled with some bacon grease for seasoning and served with cornbread to soak up the broth.  There are lots of recipes for rutabagas on the net.  My mother chunked them up and canned them, so I'm going to try raising some next summer.

Thanks again, Deanna 

December 28, 2009
7:36 am
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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I have never had a rutabaga just to eat.  It's always been a little bit added just for flavoring, or in a pasty......... I may have to try something new.  I do like the taste, I just didn't know any way to make it.  And evidently my father didn't like them, or I would have been eating them as I grew up!  Wink

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

December 28, 2009
8:46 am
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Joyce
Western WV
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An old friend brought us a couple of big heavy vegetables that he called Hanovers about a week ago. He said he had never raised them from seed but his daughter brought his some plants in the Spring from the Ohio Amish country.  He likes to peel them and use pieces in salads or put in stews.  I like the mild sweet taste and the crunch,  but like you I am not any closer to knowing what they really are. I am trying to include a picture I took this morning.  Sure would like to find out how to grow them before the planting season gets going.

December 28, 2009
10:41 am
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ChrisUK
Netley Hampshire UK
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I always thought American reference to rutabagas was what the English call swedes! no similarity to the vegetables you show in your photo. Ours are roundish,purplish in colour,then when peeled bright orange.They are cubed,cooked until tender then mashed with plenty of butter and lots of black pepper,yum. Also used in stews and Cornish Pasties,but left cubed.I think if what you show are "Hanovers".then they are a different vegetable

Im a lonely little Petunia in a Cabbage patch

December 28, 2009
12:00 pm
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Pete
WV
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And what we get as standard grocery store rutabagas here have white interior flesh.  Guess you could say that the skin has a purplish cast to it…

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

December 28, 2009
12:15 pm
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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I think that long part is the taproot that is normally cut off?  Some of our rutabaga is purple towards the top, some are not.  And from what I read that is from that part being out of the ground and sunlight getting to it.

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

December 28, 2009
2:41 pm
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BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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Yes Toph, those are rutabagas that you describe, same thing you call swedes and we use them the same ways, though not so much in pasties as not many here make them... still some of us know what pasties are at least...  but I've used rutabagas as one of the vegges in Chicken Pot Pies even if I can't claim to have made Cornish Pasties!  (though since I'm of Polish descent, would that make them Polish Pasties?)

Hanovers are some variaty that I'm not familiar with, but since I live near an Amish Market town too, maybe this spring I can do some investigating too!  There's several stores that cater to Amish, maybe they've heard of seeds even... though, that may be a reach.

Not to hijack the Hanover thread too much, but our Pot Pies are with a crust more delicate than Cornish Pasties.  Just a regular double pie crust, or sometimes just a top crust.  Usually in small oven safe bowl or there are pie pans that are bigger than a tart pan, smaller than a regular pie pan.  A single hearty serving filled with chicken stew!  (or any other stew for that matter!)

I've made it in stoneware bowls even with a square of puff pastry on top, with edges open so the pastry doesn't explode to, and for a crowd, in a 9x13 sheet pan but again only with a top crust.  I really much prefer small double crust pot pies though... hmmmm, I see supper later in the week here!  beef stew tonight, and a pot of beans is soaking... but there's that left over chicken that needs a home! heh!!! Thanks guys!!

Located in N.E. Ohio

December 28, 2009
2:54 pm
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ChrisUK
Netley Hampshire UK
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Found it!!!!!

Hanovers are Siberian Kale (Brasica Bracus) the leaves can be used as a green vegetable.

Im a lonely little Petunia in a Cabbage patch

December 28, 2009
3:09 pm
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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I don't think you can eat the root of that, Chris.  I kept finding that........Hanover Salad, but it said it had a non-tuberous root..............  Confused   It has me intrigued, that is for sure! 

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

December 28, 2009
4:19 pm
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Maud
Virginia
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When I hear Hanover, I immediately think of luscious, red tomatoes from Hanover County.  We in Central Virginia await the first Hanovers with barely concealed impatience and pounce on them like ducks pounce on June bugs.

The second thing that comes to mind is the capital of Lower Saxony

Edible, adj.: Good to eat, and wholesome to digest, as a worm to a toad, a toad to a snake, a snake to a pig, a pig to a man, and a man to a worm. ~Ambrose Bierce

December 28, 2009
4:36 pm
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Leahld22
Newburgh, IN
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What are pasties?

Life is too important to be taken too seriously.

December 28, 2009
5:17 pm
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BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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I should let Chris explain, but he's off line so I'll jump in'

Cornish Pasties are several sorts of savory or sweet fillings encased in pastry crust, (something I called a 'hand pie' growing up) and more particularly, they were very heavy crust on the edges especially so that the miners in Cornwall, (tin, copper, clay, slate and I think to some extent coal mines were HUGE employers at one point in the not to distant past, mostly played out now) but so that the miners could hold the pies easily for their midday meal, and not have to wash their hands before or after, since they had no way to do so.  The 'handle' end was not eaten since it was almost certainly very grubby.

During lean times, all that might be available to fill them was rutabagas (swedes), turnips, or other root vegetables.

Hopefully when Chris gets back on line he will let us know if I did an ok job of explaining.

Here's a picture of one!  Image Enlarger

Located in N.E. Ohio

December 28, 2009
5:35 pm
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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Here's a recipe that I got when I worked at a pasty shop in the upper peninsula of michigan in college........

http://suzannemcminn.com/forum/just-recipes/pasty/

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

December 29, 2009
6:02 am
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Joyce
Western WV
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When Virgil brought us these roots (the ones in the picture) which  he called Hanovers he told us that they grow above the ground (no taproot) just stabilizer roots, outriggers however you want to call them.  I am pretty sure the skinny end was up.  All that talk about pasties has made me hungry.

December 29, 2009
7:47 am
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ChrisUK
Netley Hampshire UK
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Perfection DebsShimmy Would grace any Cornish Pastie Shop. When can I come round and try one? I will provide the scrumpyLaugh

Cindy that recipe is pretty much spot on.I like them with a nice bite of black pepper.

Im a lonely little Petunia in a Cabbage patch

December 29, 2009
4:57 pm
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Leahld22
Newburgh, IN
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Rachel Ray just announced that she making pasties on her show tomorrow (Wed) if ya wanna watch it!

Life is too important to be taken too seriously.

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