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light cream vs heavy cream
April 5, 2010
8:19 am
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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How do you get light cream or heavy cream, specifically?  When getting it from a cow, I mean.  (Had a hard time deciding whether this went under the Barn forum or this one, but finally decided it was post-milking, so it was food!)  When you skim the milk to get the cream, what do you do differently if you want light cream vs heavy cream?  How stupid do I sound? LOL.

Clover made me do it.

April 5, 2010
8:27 am
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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Not stupid, just inquiring!

Cream is cream.  A lighter cream is just watered down cream that has been separated from the milk Smile

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

April 5, 2010
8:39 am
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CindyP
Hart, MI
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And that sounds like I’m saying to add water……..no, it’s milk.

 

Here’s a table of the % of the fat that makes up the different creams.  I got this from wikipedia.  1/2 & 1/2 is 1/2 milk and 1/2 cream.  You can go from there as to the amount of milk to add to get the cream you’re looking for.

 

Half and half (10.5–18% fat)

Light, coffee, or table cream (18–30% fat)

Medium cream (25% fat)

Whipping or light whipping cream (30–36% fat)

Heavy whipping cream (36% or more)

Extra-heavy, double, or manufacturer’s cream (38–40% or more), generally not available at retail except at some warehouse and specialty stores.

“Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have time to make them all yourself.”  ― Alfred Sheinwold

April 5, 2010
8:45 am
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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So for light cream, I would just take some regular heavy cream and mixed it half and half with milk?  And it doesn’t try to separate back out?

Clover made me do it.

April 5, 2010
9:11 am
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Pete
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Depends.  Are you planning to use it raw?  If so, then it will seperate.  Just tip the container a few times and it will remix.

(I look pretty stupid around here because I cannot break the habit from MANY years ago of gently shaking cream to mix it.  Any time I pick up a carton of cream, half and half, even milk, I give it a couple of serious tilts to emulsify the cream.  Matters not that with most commercial creams it is not necessary!  Then again, sometimes it is!)

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

April 5, 2010
9:32 am
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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Yes, raw.  Pasteurizing is an extra hassle, and if you’re using it fresh (and handling it properly), not necessary at all. 

 

I wonder how much cream you can expect per gallon of milk from a cow?

Clover made me do it.

April 5, 2010
9:44 am
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CATRAY44
By a lake in S. Michigan
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I pour off a qt. of cream from my 2 gallons of milk from my cow share.  Someone with a cow might help better here, but my guess is you will get a qt. of cream a day, at least, from your two gallons milked.

April 5, 2010
9:54 am
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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Do you find it’s different at different times of the year, how much you get?  I was just googling around about it and read that wintertime, more cream, a quart per gallon, summertime, less cream–I got the impression it depended on feed.  In winter, most family farm cows are depending more on hay and feed, while in summer, they are depending more on pasture, so the milk is likely to be richer in the winter for most people.  (as most family farmers aren’t going to spend money on hay and feed that isn’t necessary in the summer–not cost-effective, even for the extra cream, LOL)

Clover made me do it.

April 5, 2010
9:56 am
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CATRAY44
By a lake in S. Michigan
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I will have to ask my milkman!  I have a qt. delivered each week and also pour off from my two gallons.  We need a Jersey farmer to step in here! lol.

April 5, 2010
9:59 am
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BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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Suzanne, pasteurizing may not be totally necessary, but there are some dangers to not doing it too.  Brucellosis is the most common problem and these days it IS rare, but people who work closely with animals such as vets, dairy farmers, people who handle raw meat too, do still get it!  Some people with poor immune systems, small children who don’t have their defenses developed yet, some others can be in real danger from this.  The initial symptoms of it aren’t horrible, but there are complications too. 

My SIL grew up on a dairy farm and they mostly pasteurized their milk with a kitchen sized pasteurizer, but sometimes they didn’t and she and her sister and cousins and everyone else are all fine!!!  But it might be more necessary for some than others.   They all worked in the milking parlor, and all helped deliver calves etc (which is another way to contract Brucellosis) all are fine as I said, but it’s a consideration.  (not a terrifying one, just needs to be kept in mind)

There are other reasons to pasteurize milk too.  Myself I wouldn’t do it either!  Cleanliness, Excellent storage, careful handling, making sure the cow has all immunizations and cleaning the udder properly too!  If I’m doing it myself, I’d go with raw milk too, but I’d be careful saying it isn’t necessary.

//edit to say I’m sorry if that sounds preachy! really! It just worried me too.

Located in N.E. Ohio

April 5, 2010
10:24 am
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CATRAY44
By a lake in S. Michigan
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To my thinking, it is not necessary if you use common sense and keep things clean. We kill off the digestive enzymes, probiotics and vitamins when we pasteurise.

 

Here is a great article, if anyone is interested…

http://www.realmilk.com/crime-against-raw-milk.html

April 5, 2010
10:37 am
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BuckeyeGirl
N.E. Ohio
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CATRAY, just need to consider the risks and need to be aware of them is all I’m saying.  I agree with you in the main, and I’d probably not do it either, but if anyone has any immune system problems or has other health issues, be extra aware.  As I said, cleanliness, good storage, good handling etc.

Located in N.E. Ohio

April 5, 2010
10:51 am
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CATRAY44
By a lake in S. Michigan
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Ha!  I almost forgot to make my own butter- glad you had this post up today, Suzanne!

April 5, 2010
11:29 am
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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Deb, that’s okay.  People should definitely educate themselves about it and go with what’s right/comfortable for them.  It’s not something I do, but I’m just speaking for myself!

Clover made me do it.

April 5, 2010
12:12 pm
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Pete
WV
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Grew up with a neighbor who used a small home pasteurizer for part of her milk.  She kept much of it raw for use in cheese making, cooking and most drinking.  But, for the children when very young and her son with severe allergies, she used the pasteurized milk only.

Before she got the pasteurizer, she did it on her stove top!  So, it can be done if/when needed.  Common sense should be used with this, just as with all food handling/consumption.

Her counter top pasteurizer may also have separated the milk?  Not sure about that one, but if I remember correctly, the unit was very little larger than a standard blender.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!

April 5, 2010
2:27 pm
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Suzanne McMinn
Sassafras Farm in Roane County, WV
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Yes, you can do it easily right on your stovetop, you don’t need a machine to pasteurize.  I have a post on handling milk and how to pasteurize here:

 

http://suzannemcminn.com/blog/2008/09/11/handling-milk/

 

Most small farmers I know prefer to not pasteurize because it’s a hassle, they practice safe milk handling, and because pasteurization reduces the taste and nutritional value.

Clover made me do it.

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